Citric acid cycle/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Citric acid cycle.
See also changes related to Citric acid cycle, or pages that link to Citric acid cycle or to this page or whose text contains "Citric acid cycle".

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  • Acetylcholine [r]: A chemical transmitter in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) in many organisms including humans. [e]
  • Adenosine triphosphate [r]: A molecule sometimes called the "energy currency" of a cell [e]
  • Aerobic organism [r]: An organism that has an oxygen-based metabolism. [e]
  • Amino acid [r]: Biochemical with an amino group, a carboxyl group, a hydrogen atom, and a side chain bonded to a central carbon. [e]
  • Anabolism [r]: Biological processes that build larger molecules from smaller ones, and increase the size of bones, organs and muscles. [e]
  • Beta oxidation [r]: The process by which fatty acids, in the form of Acyl-CoA molecules, are broken down in the mitochondria to generate Acetyl-CoA, the entry molecule for the Krebs Cycle. [e]
  • Biochemistry [r]: The chemistry of living things; a field of both biology and chemistry. [e]
  • Biology [r]: The science of life — of complex, self-organizing, information-processing systems living in the past, present or future. [e]
  • Carbon dioxide [r]: Chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. [e]
  • Catabolism [r]: The metabolic process that breaks down molecules into smaller units. [e]
  • Cell (biology) [r]: The basic unit of life, consisting of biochemical networks enclosed by a membrane. [e]
  • Cellular respiration [r]: A series of metabolic processes by which living cells produce energy through the oxidation of organic substances. [e]
  • Coenzyme A [r]: A coenzyme notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidization of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle. [e]
  • Diabetes mellitus [r]: Relative or absolute lack of insulin leading to uncontrolled carbohydrate metabolism. [e]
  • Enzyme [r]: A protein that catalyzes (i.e. accelerate) chemical reactions. [e]
  • Eukaryote [r]: An organism that is composed of one or more cells containing cell nuclei. [e]
  • Fatty acid metabolism [r]: Oxidative degradation of saturated fatty acids in which two-carbon units are sequentially removed from the molecule with each turn of the cycle, and metabolized so that it can be used as a source of energy in aerobic respiration. [e]
  • Fermentation (biochemistry) [r]: The process of deriving energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, such as carbohydrates, using an endogenous electron acceptor, which is usually an organic compound. [e]
  • Flavin [r]: A tricyclic biochemical based on pteridine that is derived from the vitamin riboflavin. [e]
  • Gluconeogenesis [r]: Formation of glucose, especially by the liver, from noncarbohydrate precursors, such as amino acids, lactate, pyruvate, and the glycerol portion of fats. [e]
  • Glucose [r]: A monosaccharide (or simple sugar) and an important carbohydrate in biology, used by the living cell as a source of energy and metabolic intermediate. [e]
  • Glycolysis [r]: A biochemical pathway by which a molecule of glucose is oxidized to two molecules of pyruvate. [e]
  • Metabolism [r]: The modification of chemical substances by living organisms. [e]
  • Microbial metabolism [r]: The means by which a microbe obtains the energy and nutrients (e.g. carbon) it needs to live and propagate. [e]
  • Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine [r]: Award conferred once a year by the Swedish Karolinska Institute, for physiology or medicine, since 1901. [e]
  • Protein [r]: A polymer of amino acids; basic building block of living systems. [e]
  • Urea cycle [r]: Cycle of biochemical reactions occurring in many animals that produces urea (NH2)2CO from ammonia (NH3), with the key reaction being the hydrolysis of arginine by arginase to ornithine and urea. [e]