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  • ...andard English|standard]]', typically [[written language|written]] form of English in the USA. [[linguistics|Linguists]], however, would use it to mean any di :''"Indeed, in many respects, she was quite English, and was an excellent example of the fact that we have really everything in
    3 KB (451 words) - 16:43, 20 April 2014
  • ...gory:Articles written in American English|all articles written in American English]].
    492 members (0 subcategories, 0 files) - 18:06, 3 January 2014
  • This table lists the numbers of articles written in particular [[varieties of English]]. It does not include articles without [[CZ:Article structure#Metadata|met ...es within variant<ref>Shows the percentage of articles within a variant of English that are at the 'advanced' stage ('[[:Category:Citable versions of articles
    21 KB (2,519 words) - 23:42, 6 January 2014
  • ...A further complication is the similarity of Canadian English to [[American English]]. ...ng of words with -''ise''. More modern terminology, however, is frequently American: Canadians usually say ''trunk'' and ''hood'' rather than ''boot'' and ''bo
    4 KB (564 words) - 05:32, 21 October 2013
  • ...to indicate stress and pronunciation: for an explanation and table, see [[English spellings]]; there is also a key at the foot of this page'' ...Grammar|Grammatical]] and lexical differences between British and American English are, for the most part, common to all dialects, but there are many regional
    61 KB (9,638 words) - 14:46, 14 February 2021
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Commonwealth English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    695 B (92 words) - 20:34, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English language}}
    461 B (59 words) - 15:42, 15 February 2011
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|British English}}
    1 KB (158 words) - 13:55, 3 August 2011
  • ...and the English spoken in [[Mozambique]] and [[Rwanda]]. These do not have English as the colonial language: Mozambique was part of the [[Portugal|Portuguese
    1 KB (179 words) - 18:43, 22 March 2014
  • ...n the Archives at http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Talk:British_and_American_English/Archive_1, but, I guess wore ourselves out so badly that we never actually ...n I was at (British) school, the fifth form was 15-16 year olds. Given how Americans seem to inflate numbers (and everything else) I suppose their fifth form w
    162 KB (26,245 words) - 03:42, 11 February 2015
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/British and American English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    775 B (100 words) - 16:31, 11 January 2010
  • == Northern Irish English: British or Irish? == ...ern Irish English suggests "whether Northern Irish English is also British English is a matter of perspective."
    14 KB (2,261 words) - 10:44, 10 January 2011
  • | pagename = American English | abc = English, American
    815 B (65 words) - 03:10, 29 December 2013
  • ...ety it is, e.g. language = British English. If it is not clear, language = English would also be possible. [[User:John Stephenson|John Stephenson]] 04:20, 28 ...are British English and American English. Scots not allowed, because most English speakers can't read it. So, what are BrE and AmE--languages or dialects?
    2 KB (288 words) - 18:46, 28 July 2007
  • ...of the Philological Society, 40-61) in which he introduced [[The Survey of English Usage]]. ...ase for its new [[The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language|American Heritage Dictionary]], the first dictionary to be compiled using corpus lin
    5 KB (677 words) - 12:31, 26 September 2007
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/British English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    1 KB (168 words) - 16:31, 11 January 2010
  • 'Varieties of English' refers to the many [[dialect]]s of the [[English language]]: {{r|British English}}
    696 B (85 words) - 16:24, 9 January 2011
  • | pagename = British and American English ...in "AE" - American, "AuE" - Australian, "BE" - British or "CE" - Canadian English.-->
    2 KB (217 words) - 23:08, 4 March 2010
  • ..., and [[English spellings|spellings]] are ways of writing these sounds. [[English phonemes]] have different spellings depending on a word's provenance and hi ...ced before a consonant, and [[British English|British]] and [[Commonwealth English]] (BrE), where it is not.
    42 KB (7,225 words) - 20:50, 28 April 2017
  • ...'AuE'' (Australian English), ''BE'' (British English), or ''CE'' (Canadian English). See also [[:Category:Advanced Article Metadata variant error|advanced art
    0 members (0 subcategories, 0 files) - 18:03, 3 January 2014
  • ...unes of different peoples being one reason for the extinction of many more American languages in the last four hundred years.<ref>For more information on langu ...] and [[military]] power of the USA has spread the influence of [[American English]] far beyond U.S. borders.
    3 KB (457 words) - 08:15, 10 June 2008
  • ...onounced [ˈzed] in [[British English]] and [ˈziː] in [[American English|American]], and these are sometimes spelt ''zed'' and ''zee''. ==Use in English==
    4 KB (700 words) - 20:40, 4 April 2017
  • ...'AuE'' (Australian English), ''BE'' (British English), or ''CE'' (Canadian English) in the article's metadata page. See also [[:Category:Metadata variant erro
    0 members (0 subcategories, 0 files) - 18:09, 3 January 2014
  • {{subpages}}{{:English spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}}{{TOC|right}} ...spelling]]s'''. This can be seen at its most extravagant in the field of [[English noun#Types of nouns|proper noun]]s&mdash;for example, simply adding an 'h'
    29 KB (5,292 words) - 23:48, 13 April 2017
  • ...ticles without a variant of English assigned|articles without a variant of English assigned]].
    637 members (0 subcategories, 0 files) - 18:10, 3 January 2014
  • ...y confusing. But if it's ubiquitous, it's the correct from to go in under 'American' presumably. ::Another thing: I was under the impression that Americans didn't also say 'autumn'. Would you say that 'fall' was more common? If
    102 KB (16,922 words) - 18:58, 6 October 2008
  • *[[The Sound Pattern of English]] ====English====
    9 KB (910 words) - 22:14, 12 March 2021
  • ...me time, from informal version to formal; I think it was...yes, got it, an English DJ, changed from Pete to Peter, I wonder what WP has for him... [[User:Ro T I like the lobster picture, by the way. You look like an American tennis player from the 1950s... [[User:Ro Thorpe|Ro Thorpe]] 18:19, 28 Febr
    46 KB (7,791 words) - 20:35, 24 October 2009
  • ...'potato chips' (American name). For the heated food see [[French fries]] (American-style) and [[chips (food)|chips]] (British-style).}} ...' (in [[British English]], called '''potato chips''' in [[American English|American]]) are a dry snack food of extremely thin slices of [[potato]] that are gen
    1 KB (166 words) - 18:47, 4 June 2009
  • ...linguists throughout the world to show pronunciation. It is an expanded [[English alphabet]], with the [[Greek alphabet|Greek]] letter theta (θ) representin ...erminology; slashes: /'slæʃɪz/ and brackets: ['brækɪts] in [[American English]].</ref> The former are used for [[phoneme|phonemic]] transcription, the la
    4 KB (728 words) - 00:44, 26 November 2009
  • {{r|English grammar}} {{r|English phonemes}}
    1 KB (123 words) - 15:23, 9 January 2011
  • ...{{#ifeq: {{{status}}}|1| [[Category:Advanced Articles written in American English|{{{abc| }}}]]}} ...{#ifeq: {{{status}}}|1| [[Category:Advanced Articles written in Australian English|{{{abc| }}}]]}}
    3 KB (398 words) - 16:44, 18 August 2015
  • ...ma Theory, Psychoanalysis, Cultural Studies, Literary Theory, 20th Century American and British Literature, Modernism and Postmodernism, and Psychology as appl ...ntly, she is assistant professor of English and American Literature at the English Philology Department at Complutense University, Madrid (UCM). She is also a
    1 KB (172 words) - 23:07, 29 June 2009
  • {{r|Oxford English Dictionary||**}} {{r|American English}}
    654 B (78 words) - 21:40, 9 April 2010
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ''[[British English|BrE]]'' '''môuld''' = ''[[American English|AmE]]'' '''môld
    11 KB (1,732 words) - 00:33, 7 July 2017
  • {{r|English language}} {{r|American English}}
    217 B (27 words) - 15:04, 30 May 2009
  • ...heastern]] [[United States of America]] named after the southern [[England|English]] [[Counties of England|county]] of [[Hampshire]]. ...ed against British rule in the [[American Revolution]]. By the time of the American Revolution, New Hampshire was a divided province. The economic and social l
    39 KB (5,726 words) - 06:14, 9 February 2008
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/English phonemes]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    1 KB (185 words) - 21:19, 11 January 2010
  • ...icle to American English. Does Citizendium have a policy of using American English only, or does it use the same policy as Wikipedia, of using the appropriate ...ul in the future to make sure I am not just changing something to American English. Thank you for bringing that to my attention. --[[User:Ted Zellers|Ted Ze
    2 KB (277 words) - 23:42, 22 January 2007
  • ...Notes towards a description''. Schools Council Program in Linguistics and English Teaching, papers series 2 (No. 2). London: Longmans, for the Schools Counci * [[Mark Aronoff|Aronoff, Mark]]. (1978). An English spelling convention. ''Linguistic Inquiry'', ''9'', 299-303.
    5 KB (618 words) - 03:09, 19 March 2010
  • ...ish, the question of national identity and culture in the early moments of American independence, and the poetics of citation and of definition. * "Noah Webster" in ''The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes'' (1907–21). vol 18 section 25:33 [http://www.ba
    4 KB (585 words) - 20:37, 10 August 2011
  • ...standards such as [[British English]], [[American English]], [[Australian English]]...
    2 KB (250 words) - 12:35, 5 August 2011
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Canadian English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    557 B (72 words) - 16:37, 11 January 2010
  • Also, I assume that you are using British English conventions here? Otherwise, the quotes should be double, not single. --[[ ===British or American English?===
    85 KB (14,100 words) - 06:27, 9 May 2008
  • ...h" which is a bit broader in scope than either American English or British English, and which allows for multiple name transliterations and less spelling rigo ::::With respect to the World English, American English or British English, you should look with some haste at [http://forum.citizendium.org/index.php
    9 KB (1,473 words) - 18:56, 10 November 2010
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|British English}}
    763 B (95 words) - 19:01, 9 March 2015
  • #REDIRECT [[British and American English]]
    42 B (5 words) - 08:14, 22 July 2009
  • ..., e.g. for board drills: hêar, hêre, thére. Well, it seems my link to [[English phonemes]] doesn't do the trick, so I reckon the best thing would be to put ...ue what you meant by this, but your comment at [[Talk:British and American English]] makes it clear. Well, however you think they are best organised... [[User
    31 KB (5,143 words) - 18:34, 24 June 2017
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ...ften italicised and ending in written -'''''é''''', see [[French words in English]]: -'''e'''
    36 KB (5,897 words) - 00:42, 23 August 2017
  • ...nglish]]. For more information, see ''[[CZ:Variants of English|Variants of English]]''.
    9,698 members (0 subcategories, 0 files) - 18:02, 3 January 2014
  • ==New Deal (American English and British English)== ...d as "BE" for the New deal article, meaning that it is wrritten in British English. So, for example, the spelling "program" is incorrect - it should be progra
    33 KB (5,419 words) - 19:08, 10 February 2021
  • ...oalition of [[Native American]]s against [[England|English colonists]]; an English victory
    190 B (26 words) - 02:19, 12 September 2009
  • == English language variant == ...h? The article currently is written in a mixture of American and Canadian English. [[User:Richard Williams|Richard Williams]] 21:35, 23 July 2008 (CDT)
    2 KB (299 words) - 11:54, 26 April 2011
  • :: PS: Restricting it to pages in English gives 344K for "Usama bin Laden" and 670K for "Osama". Less of a difference ...should be descriptive - and currently the vast majority of writers in the English language use "Osama", not "Usama". The Google statistics given by [[User:J.
    91 KB (15,225 words) - 00:39, 4 May 2012
  • ...ionary that was first published in 1828 as ''An American Dictionary of the English Language''. ...llege [[Ezra Stiles]]. Webster's four years at Yale overlapped with the [[American Revolution]], and because of food shortages, many of his college classes we
    16 KB (2,437 words) - 18:13, 12 August 2011
  • ...andard English|standard]]', typically [[written language|written]] form of English in the UK and especially southern [[England]]. [[linguistics|Linguists]], h ...te)|Republic of Ireland]], where 'British' spellings are part of [[Hiberno-English]].
    7 KB (990 words) - 16:38, 9 January 2011
  • **[[English spellings/Catalogs/Apostrophe]] {{r|English phonemes}}
    485 B (63 words) - 19:37, 14 September 2011
  • '''Regular verbs''' in '''English''' have four forms: ...how stress and pronunciation: see [[English spellings]] for a table and [[English phonemes]] for the [[International Phonetic Alphabet|IPA]]. There is also a
    13 KB (2,513 words) - 11:06, 28 January 2017
  • ...the letters of the English alphabet, which all use the following system:{{:English spellings/Accents}} {{:English spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}}
    4 KB (556 words) - 18:58, 5 December 2020
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} mostly schwa; stressed -'''ër''' in some words; [[British and American English|some AmE -'''er''' words are -'''re''' in BrE]]: -'''er
    13 KB (2,002 words) - 23:55, 2 August 2017
  • | id = [[American English|en-<br />us]] ...has an '''advanced''' understanding of '''[[:Category:User en-us|American English]]'''.
    298 B (32 words) - 22:26, 29 May 2010
  • ...[[River Wye]], ''why'' pronounced with an English accent (i.e. without the American, Scottish etc. aspiration of ''wh''). ==Use in English==
    6 KB (1,096 words) - 15:09, 19 December 2016
  • ...re to what extent it deviates from American English, but as the subject is American, it probably ought to conform in language. --[[User:Martin Wyatt|Martin Wy
    247 B (39 words) - 20:54, 28 October 2012
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''Mâpplethorpe''' ''Robert'' *Mâplethorpe: unusual flouting of [[English spellings#Double letters|double-consonant rule]] in person's name, cf. '''m
    21 KB (3,209 words) - 13:09, 5 September 2017
  • Yes and I just checked the Smithsonian web site, for their new African American museum, and they don't capitalize black either. My bad. It's a Canadian thi ...it may have something to do with the emergence of the capitalized "African American" as the preferred formal term (per the Smithsonian museum website, etc.). 1
    46 KB (7,573 words) - 08:26, 4 November 2008
  • ...(letter)|B]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈeɪ], like the [[strong form]] of the indefinite arti ==Use in English==
    15 KB (2,623 words) - 17:05, 10 August 2017
  • ...bbbb; border-bottom:1px solid #dddddd">&nbsp;[[CZ:English language variant|English language variant]]:&nbsp;</font>''' {{#switch:{{{{BASEPAGENAME}}/Metadata|i |AE= American English
    10 KB (893 words) - 15:26, 17 September 2020
  • This article appears to be in British English, with -ize endings [i.e. Oxford English] so I have inserted that as the language variant. I have also promoted it t ...by that time! I'll also need help with final copyediting as I'm not native English - grammar and spelling errors are likely to remain unnoticed!
    28 KB (4,647 words) - 04:37, 27 February 2009
  • ...so mark the article as being written in American English. (Isn't "American English" an oxymoron?) ...English, and is one of the things ''which'' trips me up most when reading American writings.
    28 KB (4,618 words) - 20:51, 14 December 2009
  • *British English: :*''A Dictionary of Modern English Usage'' (Fowler's) (1926 - )
    3 KB (405 words) - 15:46, 20 April 2010
  • ...vernment, and other countries don't send their ambassadors there. There is English Law, and Scottish Law, but no British Law. I would like the name of my coun ....''' The preferred adjective is '''British.''' The main language is the '''English''' language. Citizens are called '''Britons''' or (informally) '''Brits.'''
    48 KB (7,961 words) - 05:02, 3 January 2011
  • ...phonemes#Vowels and diphthongs]], list of all the vowel sounds of standard English; scroll down for '''the schwa sound''' {{r|British and American English}}
    959 B (133 words) - 22:41, 31 January 2013
  • | title = British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns | title = Divided by a Common Language: A Guide to British and American English
    464 B (57 words) - 04:10, 6 November 2009
  • ...ues in a number of languages using the [[Latin alphabet]], especially in [[English]], [[Irish Gaelic|Irish and]] [[Scottish Gaelic]], [[Cornish]], [[Italian]] ==Use in English==
    4 KB (585 words) - 03:40, 9 June 2016
  • |colspan=2 align="right"|'''English language variant'''||colspan=2 |{{#switch:{{{{BASEPAGENAME}}/Metadata|info= |AE= American English
    9 KB (875 words) - 03:58, 17 April 2008
  • A '''theatre''' (spelt '''theater''' in [[American English|US English]]) is a structure in which [[theatre|theatrical]] or dramatic works, often *[[Cinema]] (American English "movie theater")
    4 KB (553 words) - 23:09, 21 September 2020
  • ...org/wiki/Азимов,_Айзек]) was a [[Russia]]n-born [[United States|American]] [[author]] and ...in Australia, friends in Europe, and for 4 years a girlfriend who was from American Samoa, just across the dateline. More intellectual madness.
    62 KB (10,663 words) - 16:51, 12 June 2008
  • {{r|American cuisine}} {{r|American culture}}
    4 KB (531 words) - 18:53, 11 March 2021
  • ...o known as the Big Dipper (in American English) and the Plough (in British English).
    440 B (56 words) - 18:01, 29 October 2011
  • ...her languages, of comparable (or superior--smiling broadly) quality to the English-language one. * [[American Cryonics Society]]
    25 KB (3,596 words) - 09:17, 21 April 2012
  • ...e two technical terms, 'comprehension' and 'extension', instead of a plain English account? The term 'comprehension' is not concealed from the reader: it is d The UK spellings have been converted to American spellings - that might be a source of contention. I don't see much objecti
    61 KB (10,299 words) - 16:26, 20 November 2011
  • Is that normal English nowadays? Or American English? I don't think I'd heard it before, though I was aware that it must imply n
    640 B (105 words) - 02:36, 2 June 2011
  • ...ndrome), not "Aids", despite what the BBC write. [http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/static/in_depth/africa/2000/aids_in_africa/default.stm][http://news.bbc.co. ...ma' is to be avoided - we should prefer "History of American religion" to "American religion, history" - "Religion in the United States" would be the ideal tit
    11 KB (1,806 words) - 17:32, 1 July 2009
  • ...similarities between languages as apparently diverse as [[English language|English]], [[Japanese language|Japanese]] and [[Arabic language|Arabic]]? What are ...to speakers of that language.</ref> is unacceptable in [[English language|English]], but children recognise as much long before they receive any formal gramm
    30 KB (4,399 words) - 17:14, 2 October 2014
  • The name in American English for ''Solanum melongena'', a perennial cultivated for its edible fruits.
    137 B (18 words) - 21:53, 31 May 2008
  • ...English poet and playwright widely regarded as the greatest writer of the English language, as well as one of the greatest in Western literature, and the wor ...)'' meaning "shape or form" and ''λόγος (logos)'' meaning "speak". In English the suffix "-(o)logy" means "the study of". For ancient Greeks, study often
    33 KB (5,370 words) - 23:46, 2 August 2010
  • ...curious, however, as to why British English is been translated to American English; e.g, Favour to favor. Its not a big problem of course, but may be in the f ...ine David. Its not something I care terribly about (The British V American English debate that is) but I recognise many don't feel the same way and so had to
    7 KB (1,054 words) - 14:39, 14 February 2021
  • ...irst, feel free to correct spelling or style (I am not so used to write in English). In case you are not sure about such a correction (for instance if you are ...". However, if this is an issue of the Queen's english versus my American english, or some other purely cultural artifact, let me know and I'll be happy to c
    9 KB (1,496 words) - 21:44, 24 December 2008
  • ....S. politics and education prefer terms such as 'pro-English' or 'official English'. ...Discrimination Complaint]'. December 6 2006. See also ''Bill may push for English only: State-documents idea called rights violation'' (''Columbus Dispatch''
    7 KB (1,019 words) - 08:10, 10 June 2008
  • ...anywhere else in the text (unless they start a sentence). As for Earth, in English the uncapitalized word "earth" usually denotes the soil at the surface of t ...es, I selected AE in the metadata templates and a good many CZ members are Americans ... yet you are the first person to comment on my use of kilometre rather
    17 KB (2,921 words) - 10:13, 1 December 2009
  • ...(informally '''note''' in [[British English]] and '''bill''' in [[American English]]; also called '''paper money''') is a written assurance of payment to the
    1 KB (191 words) - 20:23, 28 August 2013
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/English alphabet]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|British English}}
    1 KB (172 words) - 21:19, 11 January 2010
  • ''Works cited in the [[Canadian English]] article'' *Lilles J (2000) 'The myth of Canadian English'. ''English Today'' 16: 3-9, 17.
    428 B (55 words) - 09:20, 26 April 2008
  • ...as the [[Juan de Fuca Plate]] is [[subduction|subducted]] below the North American Plate. The most recent large eruption was the explosion in 1980 of [[Mount ...and runs to the [[Mendocino Triple Junction]] at the borders of the North American Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate, and the [[Pacific Plate]]. The fault runs fu
    36 KB (5,120 words) - 18:54, 11 March 2021
  • ...chniques, that indeed suggest that "they surrendered on a battleship to an American general" may be the appropriate level, as long as there are hyperlinks for :::Hmmm...well, I got it from Condon, but I shall share the NANOG ([[North American Network Operators' Group]]) curse, which can be useful:
    26 KB (4,252 words) - 20:35, 24 October 2009
  • ...ers of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's ''Dictionary of American English Usage'' for issues of usage. For British English, consult Fowler's ''Modern English Usage''.
    9 KB (1,483 words) - 17:09, 25 August 2009
  • ...[British English]], ''tramway''; also known as ''streetcar'' in [[American English]]) is a rail vehicle for use in urban areas. Trams are almost exclusively u
    1 KB (171 words) - 07:25, 19 March 2010
  • ...ng African American Poetry" by Jerry W. Ward, Jr., from ''Teaching African American Literature'' by M. Graham, Routledge, 1998, page 146.</ref> ...t of [[American literature]], with books such as ''[[Roots: The Saga of an American Family]]'' by [[Alex Haley]], ''[[The Color Purple]]'' by [[Alice Walker]],
    39 KB (5,962 words) - 15:38, 27 December 2020
  • ...part of an imparted list; I created the entry under [[Congressional Native American Caucus]]. He also came up on [[U.S. Congressional Caucuses]], which is an ...uched fusee, which I suspect is more British English. More common American English for "fusee" would be "highway flare". Both a fusee and a fuse are pyrotechn
    213 KB (35,247 words) - 17:43, 4 April 2011
  • ...age and history, American Indian peoples, radical politics, and mainstream American political biography. ...native English speaker, writing comfortably in either British or American English. I have a basic-to-intermediate command of Chinese, which is basically the
    799 B (119 words) - 00:01, 19 March 2008
  • ...h context, which we don't have here, so I'd think it's better to rename to English custom. --[[User:Daniel Mietchen|Daniel Mietchen]] 23:07, 3 January 2011 (U I disagree with deleting “Objects (things)” and my other English grammar and composition articles, as well as my article, “Vacuum cleaner.
    102 KB (17,068 words) - 14:50, 17 March 2012
  • ...tters of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's Dictionary of American English "Usage for issues of usage. ::"For British English, consult Fowler's Modern English Usage."
    10 KB (1,548 words) - 13:00, 1 August 2011
  • ...f followers in [[North America]], including traditionally Buddhist [[Asian American]]s as well as non-Asian converts. America presents a strikingly new and dif ...built in 1853 in [[San Francisco]] by the [[Sze Yap Company]], a [[Chinese American]] fraternal society. Another society, the [[Ning Yeong Company]], built a s
    49 KB (7,547 words) - 08:41, 1 November 2013
  • Click on the grid to see the lists and letter articles:{{:English spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ...tters of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's Dictionary of American English Usage for issues of usage. <br/> <br/>
    80 KB (13,484 words) - 14:50, 27 January 2012
  • ...}</noinclude>(c. 1612 - 1672) Colonial American poet, considered the first English poet in the New World.
    127 B (17 words) - 18:30, 23 July 2009
  • I believe this article should be written in American English.[[User:Aleta Curry|Aleta Curry]] 22:03, 4 September 2007 (CDT)
    137 B (18 words) - 16:40, 14 November 2007
  • ...Oxford American Dictionary'' or ''The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language'', say &mdash; and you try to use it to learn the 'meaning'<ref>We ...itive concepts''" (Wierzbicka, 1996). She gives one example comparing the English sentence, "I want to do this", with its equivalent in Russian. Although sh
    23 KB (3,574 words) - 17:13, 3 September 2011
  • ==What does Commonwealth English mean?== ...uss what it is, and even whether it's appropriate to refer to varieties of English in this way at all. There seems to be several potential meanings:
    7 KB (1,105 words) - 21:49, 9 January 2011
  • ...enator]]" or "Senator Kerry is a Democrat," is standard [[American English|American]] usage, while "Kerry is a Democrat Senator" is controversial. ...006).</ref> The earliest known use of the term, according to the ''Oxford English Dictionary'', was in Britain in 1890: "Whether a little farmer...is going t
    14 KB (2,080 words) - 10:49, 27 August 2013
  • ...sage'' for issues of usage. For British English, consult Fowler's ''Modern English Usage''. ...ult chapters III and IV of [http://forms.aps.org/author/styleguide.pdf The American Physical Society Style Guide]. (Pdf).
    14 KB (2,165 words) - 23:36, 26 February 2021
  • ...or [ˈaːɹ], like the word ''are'' (with that '''r''' silent in [[British English]] finally or before a consonant: ''ah''). ==Use in English==
    8 KB (1,297 words) - 12:16, 10 April 2014
  • This article, since it will be in American English (as it concerns an American topic), should be copyedited accordingly.
    2 KB (271 words) - 20:46, 15 May 2009
  • .... In some cases, as with [[Vernon Winslow]], a.k.a. "DJ Daddy-O," African-Americans were hired to coach white announcers.
    3 KB (436 words) - 17:14, 11 June 2009
  • ===List of French words in English=== ...lics (both optionally), or have a strange or little-known pronunciation in English, in any combination.
    63 KB (10,748 words) - 01:33, 5 May 2017
  • ...(letter)|R]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈkjuː], like the words ''cue'' and ''queue''. ==Use in English==
    4 KB (583 words) - 00:17, 15 May 2016
  • Like a [[full-stop]] ([[British English]], known as a period in [[American English]]), a colon can follow a grammatically complete utterance. The same is true
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  • * ''Town and County Government in the English Colonies of North America.'' JHUSHPS, 2nd ser., no. 10. Baltimore: Johns Ho * ''Topics and References in American History, 1492-1783: Printed for the Use of Students in History.'' Cambridge
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  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''vîse''' ''grip'': [[American English|American]] alternative spelling of '''vîce''' in this sense only
    4 KB (606 words) - 10:29, 20 July 2017
  • ...(1758-1843) US lexicographer who compiled the ''American Dictionary of the English Language'' and wrote a widely used ''Speller'' for use in schools in the te
    223 B (32 words) - 15:05, 20 March 2009
  • ...sisted largely of reading American, English, German and French classics in English, supplemented by my own extensive source material readings of history, phil
    2 KB (330 words) - 09:59, 2 December 2020
  • ...only need American English and British (or Commonwealth, if you'd rather) English. {{r|American Heart Association||:::::}}
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  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''únto''' *úntû, unlike '''ínto''' and '''ónto''', used in modern English only in certain set expressions (e.g. '''do únto òthers''' *dû úntû ú
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  • {{creditline|PD|Image|Google Books: Samuel Hahneman's 2nd American Edition in English translated from the 5th ed. by R.E. Dudgeon, M.D., Boericke & Tafel, Philad
    708 B (109 words) - 09:56, 6 June 2009
  • ...es-poo-diving-shop-japan.jpg|thumb|right|300px|Japanese [[English language|English]] trade names may cause some amusement for those accustomed to other meanin ...ese-speakers non-fluent in English may pronounce 'English'), or the use of English as a working language in certain institutions such as research centres or p
    9 KB (1,370 words) - 03:35, 16 February 2010
  • ...'[[lexical category]]'', distinct from other classes such as ''[[verb]]''. English [[Word (language)|words]] may be used as nouns if they accept certain [[gra ..., or with inflections and affixes that modify words. In [[English language|English]], for instance, it is not obvious whether 'bank' is a noun or a verb until
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  • ...born in [[Buenos Aires]]. He grew up speaking and reading both Spanish and English, and spending his teen years in Europe, he learned several other languages ...e of fiction and thus opened the way to a remarkable generation of Spanish American novelists."<ref>Coetzee, J.M., "Borges's Dark Mirror", ''New York Review of
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  • ...d community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "[[short, sharp shock]]", "What, never? Well, hardly ever ...tp://www.bartelby.net/223/0815.html ''The Cambridge History of English and American Literature''], Volume XIII, Chapter VIII, Section 15 (1907–21)</ref>
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  • <noinclude>{{Subpages}}</noinclude>English-American hard rock band founded in [[Los Angeles]], [[California]], comprising of si
    239 B (30 words) - 16:13, 8 February 2014
  • ...ngs. Perhaps change to: kilometer or kilometre? see [[British and American English]]. - [[User:Ro Thorpe|Ro Thorpe]] 00:35, 11 February 2010 (UTC)
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  • ...ith the various regions inside Germany; these are called "West Germanic". English is theoretically in the same continuum, but it diverged considerably more f ...es features of so many different Germanic dialects (including Frisian, Old English, Saxon, and Low Franconian). High German dialects are a mix of Bavarian, Al
    42 KB (6,856 words) - 06:28, 31 May 2008
  • ...U.S. call all Northerners "Yankees", and people outside the U.S. call all Americans "Yankees" or "Yanks." ...h descent, yet they continue to have disproportionate influence over major American institutions, especially cultural, educational, business and financial ones
    9 KB (1,280 words) - 23:38, 14 February 2010
  • {{r|English language}} {{r|American English}}
    332 B (40 words) - 10:11, 31 May 2009
  • ==Varieties of English== ...ticle, but then there arises the problem of what to call it. 'Varieties of English'? But you seem to be the expert on that subject. Please advise. [[User:Ro T
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  • ...(letter)|P]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈəʊ] or [ˈoʊ], like the exclamation ''oh!'' ==Use in English==
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  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} [[British English|BrE]] ''barrier, drink'' '''bàr''' = ''sheep'' '''bàa'''
    6 KB (884 words) - 18:10, 13 May 2017
  • ...t transportations. As opposed to what are called [[railroad]]s in American English, they have stayed active and efficient, and indeed often serve what would b
    303 B (47 words) - 17:15, 1 June 2009
  • ...9176 extremely embarrassing error]... this was because this and [[American English]] have been started with similar material. :) [[User:John Stephenson|John S
    335 B (41 words) - 10:55, 6 June 2008
  • ...tters of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's Dictionary of American English Usage for issues of usage. :For British English, consult Fowler's Modern English Usage.
    37 KB (6,037 words) - 19:32, 2 November 2010
  • ...d grammar, primarily whether the article is written in American or English English.
    7 KB (978 words) - 11:50, 18 September 2013
  • {{r|African American literature}} {{r|British and American English}}
    3 KB (354 words) - 21:41, 11 January 2010
  • ...ticle is American and hence the language of the article should be American English. * "approved", - in American English, the comma goes inside the quotation marks
    15 KB (2,415 words) - 20:02, 28 July 2009
  • |Asl-i-love-you.jpg|''I love you'' in [[American Sign Language]]. ....jpg|An example of [[written language]] - in this case, [[English language|English]].
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  • Bachelor of Arts, English French American Literature, Creative Writing Institute for American Universities
    2 KB (276 words) - 00:58, 31 March 2007
  • ...ank you for the rephrasing in [[Cyprus]]. As you can see, I'm not a native English speaker. It's not important for me, but do you really consider ''sovran, so ...ore to the point: 'Var. (poet.) of 'sovereign'. So as a retired teacher of English as a foreign language I strongly advise you to save that spelling for your
    42 KB (6,926 words) - 15:32, 17 August 2009
  • ...small amount of literature from the US is written in other languages than English, especially in [[Spanish]]. ...he literary outcome of the former colonies gradually found its own unique 'American' voice and formed its own literary tradition.
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  • ...difficulty of such an undertaking -- particularly with a language such as English which has a relatively high proportion of irregular and inconsistent usage ...of words rather than their categorization, is preferred. Particularly with English, the model is useful, as we have so many words capable of functioning as se
    6 KB (1,036 words) - 17:34, 15 February 2010
  • ...British. As the articles here seem to have been written mainly in American English, your solution may be better after all indeed. Best regards, [[User:Stefan
    9 KB (1,428 words) - 10:30, 26 December 2011
  • '''African-American Studies''' *''[[African American Review]]'' ([http://aar.slu.edu/ journal home])
    27 KB (4,073 words) - 06:59, 28 February 2009
  • ...fficially called '''Moldovan''' (in Romanian: ''limba moldovenească''; in English: ''Moldovan'' or rarely ''Moldavian''). ...nces are insignificant compared with those of British English and American English.
    8 KB (1,239 words) - 09:55, 25 September 2011
  • ...ecause there is a supposed European "line", but then there are British and American symphonists). I'm picking up eight more books on the subject when the unive ...mphony than anything freely available at this point. Compared to the main English language music dictionaries (New Grove and the New Harvard 2nd edition; I d
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  • {{r|African American Vernacular English}} {{r|Singapore English}}
    653 B (75 words) - 07:57, 7 March 2010
  • {{r|British and American English}}
    468 B (61 words) - 22:49, 11 January 2010
  • ...with only a classified annex. While they were first done under contract at American Univerity; the work then went to the Foreign Research Division of the Libra ...shes and 21-gun salutes and such, uses "Chief of State." But the official American Forces Press Service uses "head of state" in its press releases. So even th
    9 KB (1,465 words) - 11:02, 8 September 2020
  • ...1916) was an American-born writer who in 1915 by naturalization became an English citizen. He was the younger brother of the pragmatist philosopher [[William ...ings of the Dove (1902); The Golden Bowl (1904); English Hours (1905); The American Scene (1907); The High Bid (1909); Italian Hours (1909).
    1 KB (144 words) - 21:34, 15 August 2010
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|Canadian English}}
    319 B (41 words) - 20:51, 10 August 2011
  • ...t = AE for American English or AU for Australian English or BE for British English
    14 KB (2,329 words) - 02:28, 17 May 2010
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''râbid''' ([[American English|AmE]] can be '''á''')
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  • * [[Clara Bow]], American actress * [[Richard Brautigan]], American writer and poet
    23 KB (3,486 words) - 10:29, 2 August 2011
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} see [[English irregular nouns]]: -'''ôes'''
    11 KB (1,818 words) - 23:29, 13 April 2017
  • [[Orientalism]] is the western (European and American) study of "the Orient" in its traditional, more expansive, sense. During th ...cidental" is still sometimes used to refer to Europeans (and by extension, Americans of European origin).
    9 KB (1,441 words) - 04:41, 16 April 2014
  • ...nch (tool)|wrench]]''' ([[American English]]), or '''spanner''' ([[British English]]), is a [[fastening tool]] used to manipulate threaded fasteners such as [ ...s. 1/2", 3/4", and 1" drives are used for heavy equipment. Both metric and English system sockets, however, can snap onto the male end of the shaft.
    9 KB (1,487 words) - 07:17, 25 October 2013
  • ...rred to as a '''vapor'''<ref>American spelling: the [[British and American English|British variant]] is '''vapour'''</ref>) is one of the four major [[Physics
    8 KB (1,191 words) - 00:28, 23 January 2011
  • '''Quotation marks''', or (especially in British English) '''inverted commas''', also called, less formally, ''speech marks'' or ''q ...g>'''“'''...'''”'''</big> and <big>'''‘'''...'''’'''</big> as in [[English]] and many other languages,
    18 KB (2,421 words) - 10:14, 25 September 2011
  • ...use it widely; it ranks between ca. 300-500 in frequency of use in written English.<ref name=frequency/> ...|url=http://www.conlang.info/wordfreq.html |title=Word Frequency List for English}}.
    9 KB (1,370 words) - 23:04, 9 September 2012
  • ...an important [[second language]] for millions more, from [[American people|American]]s interested in the language as a link to their forefathers, to [[business ...to read such thinkers in the original German if at all possible. In fact, English nowadays sports a huge unabridged dictionary, but German does not have need
    15 KB (2,169 words) - 08:54, 22 October 2008
  • ...tters of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's Dictionary of American English Usage for issues of usage. :For British English, consult Fowler's Modern English Usage.
    142 KB (23,494 words) - 16:56, 29 September 2011
  • ...tters of formatting, punctuation, etc. and Garner's Dictionary of American English Usage for issues of usage. :For British English, consult Fowler's Modern English Usage.
    140 KB (22,219 words) - 23:14, 3 January 2009
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English language}}
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  • ...where they gave me the car, and the sadly inadequate 30-second lesson for Americans on approaching rotaries. ...m ''rotaries'' in American? This should be added to [[British and American English]]. [[User:Caesar Schinas|Caesar Schinas]] 06:32, 2 June 2009 (UTC)
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  • I have a B.A. in English from Hartwick College. Specifically, I focused on American literature (mostly post American Revolution / pre
    355 B (54 words) - 16:13, 9 April 2007
  • ...(letter)|I]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈeɪtʃ], ''aitch'', as in 'he drops his aitches', ref ==Use in English==
    9 KB (1,572 words) - 14:23, 18 July 2017
  • ...d grammar, primarily whether the article is written in American or English English.
    19 KB (2,253 words) - 05:09, 18 April 2008
  • | dialect = American English
    786 B (75 words) - 08:31, 14 September 2007
  • ...ing countries. The name has [[pagan]] origins and is taken from the [[Old English]] for Woden’s Day. ...as been considered the middle of the working week. In American colloquial English, it is often referred to as ‘hump day’, since arriving at Wednesday mea
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  • ==English Variant== Nick is this article using American or British English? The Variant is not set in the metadata. [[User:Russell D. Jones|Russell D
    8 KB (1,360 words) - 23:33, 7 February 2009
  • ==In English== {{:English spellings/Accents}}
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  • {{rpr|Japanese English}} (September 8 — September 21, 2013) {{rpr|Silent letters in English}} (December 1 — 8, 2012)
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  • ...red 14b Long Haired St. Bernard 15 Newfoundland 16 Bull Terrior 17 English Bulldog 18 French Dwarf Bulldog 19 Pug Dog.}} *[[American Eskimo]](''see also [[German Spitz]]'')
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  • ...problem is that it is drafted in a mixture of American English and British English. If you could make a ruling about which version to adopt, one of us could p ...ther thing along these lines would be some of Edward T. Hall's work on the American Southwest, where, after Latinos gained political power, there was a near re
    18 KB (2,902 words) - 07:13, 11 June 2011
  • ...e world wide web. I am an experienced contributor and administrator on the English Wikipedia, so I'm pretty good with MediaWiki's wiki markup.
    401 B (62 words) - 00:12, 26 July 2008
  • ...word is always spelt with a capital C in American English, but in British English, as in French, the wine is "champagne"; it is frequently called "champers" ...|English]] invention. This has lead some people to suggest that it was the English, and not the French, who originally produced champagne style wines. However
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  • ...biology courses, histology and cell biology and English courses, including American literature and poetry. Love reading during spare time and watching TV. Also
    511 B (70 words) - 15:19, 4 March 2009
  • ...the elements. It is also called a [[kennel]]. Speakers of [[Commonwealth English]] generally do not use the word "doghouse" in this sense; they use "kennel"
    725 B (122 words) - 07:29, 16 October 2007
  • ...ministrative law judge for Pa. Public Utility Comm'n. Interest in American English language. Retired 2005. Five years of doing intense canine agility, includi
    444 B (61 words) - 15:21, 14 February 2007
  • ...e typographic font used), at least in many English-speaking countries. The American [[National Institute of Standards and Technology]] recommends that "L" be u ...e guidance on pluralizing unit names: the plural is formed by using normal English grammar rules, for example, "henries" is the plural of "henry". The units [
    23 KB (3,580 words) - 16:31, 29 September 2011
  • '''Public''' ([[American English|AmE]]: /ˈpəblɪk/; [[British English|BrE]]: /ˈpʌblɪk/) is an important, but controversial, term widely used i ...onary?book=Dictionary&va=public| English term]] is derived from the Middle English (14th century) ''publique'', which in turn comes from Anglo-French, and ult
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  • ...a Scottish Professor of Logic and Philosophy, and reported to the eminent English economist, [[William Stanley Jevons]] who brought it to the attention of th ...=ANGLOAMMARGHET>[http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/schools/engmath.htm ''Anglo-American Marginalists'']</ref>.
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  • Bachelor's in English, minor in Ethnic American Studies from Humboldt State University, Arcata CA
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  • '''Thalassemia''' ([[American English]]) or '''thalassaemia''' ([[British English]]) is a recessive trait [[inherited]] [[blood diseases|disease]] of the [[r
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  • It is common in American folklore to assume [[rabbit]]s are incredibly fond of carrots, especially t * [[Carat]]: unit for measuring the weight of precious stones; also (UK English), unit for measuring the proportion of gold in an alloy, such that 24 carat
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  • ...lphia, 1906.JPG|left|350px|Title page, Hahnemann's 2nd America Edition, in English, Translated by R.E. Dudgeon, M.D., Boericke & Tafel, Philadelphia, 1906.}}
    591 B (87 words) - 12:43, 18 September 2020
  • ...organization in other subject headings. I just happen to write in British English. --[[User:Martin Wyatt|Martin Wyatt]] 21:42, 18 January 2013 (UTC)
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  • ...ish, but may be called "Metro" in many languages, and "subway" in American English.
    2 KB (236 words) - 22:42, 10 October 2010
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''Cadíz''' is the traditional English pronunciation, though the Spanish stresses the first syllable
    32 KB (4,846 words) - 19:57, 17 August 2017
  • *http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/american-festivals/our-lady-rock-photos/ National Geographic ...ns "obviously completely wrong"; in fact, it is standard usage in American English, which, according to the metadata, is the language variant of this article.
    36 KB (5,944 words) - 13:42, 18 October 2010
  • ...best be translated at "ethnic"; although its origins are analagous to the English "folk," it is used here by Hitler as a key term in the ''Völkische Movemen ...s willingness. We should have renounced colonies and sea power, and spared English industry our competition. Only an absolutely clear orientation could lead t
    37 KB (6,108 words) - 07:28, 26 July 2007
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''Lampedûsa''': Italian has a voiced '''s''', but unvoiced is usual in English
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  • ...of the system of [[English law]], which was in force at the time of the [[American Revolutionary War|Revolutionary War]]. However, the supreme law of the land ===American common law===
    12 KB (1,808 words) - 19:25, 5 November 2007
  • ...erm, in American English, refers to the type of card game known in British English as [[Patience]]) is a single-player [[board game]]. Its straightforward ru
    7 KB (1,310 words) - 09:48, 17 March 2020
  • ..."sock-a toe-a" depending upon the use of [[American English]] or [[British English]], or even "soccer tour"). It means:
    33 KB (5,179 words) - 13:26, 4 June 2010
  • ...nkfurt, Germany, currently studying Geography and English (with a major in American Studies) at Mainz University, supposed to finish studies next summer; my in
    591 B (96 words) - 03:22, 21 September 2007
  • Principally developed by English settlers with influences from Native Americans of the area (e.g.,[[corn]]), the style includes many things from the abund
    431 B (62 words) - 16:09, 3 July 2009
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English irregular nouns}}
    1 KB (176 words) - 22:30, 11 January 2010
  • ...ball stuffed with hair,<ref>''Mathews' Chinese-English Dictionary,'' rev. American ed. (Cambridge: Harvard U.P., 1943), nos. 6842-6843.</ref> which is mention ...agoun, ''Football in Medieval England and Middle-English literature'', The American Historical Review (vol 35, no. 1), 1929.</ref> Reports of a game called ''
    35 KB (5,525 words) - 23:34, 10 October 2020
  • ...rs. It corresponds to the North American morning [[coffee break]] and the English [[elevenses]].
    463 B (65 words) - 09:13, 26 December 2007
  • {{r|British and American English}}
    852 B (110 words) - 20:57, 11 January 2010
  • 'He attended University of Texas.' Is this acceptable in American English? [[User:Ro Thorpe|Ro Thorpe]] 18:38, 5 February 2008 (CST)
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  • Among the differences found in American English and British English, some confusion is created by the use of or absence of a hyphen in the word ...the [[Oklahoma City bombing]] of 19 April 1995, by [[Timothy McVeigh]], an American, the CI definition reasonably extends to include domestically-originated [[
    43 KB (6,102 words) - 07:25, 6 October 2013
  • ...en one of the most influential states in America. The first battles of the American Revolution were fought in the Massachusetts towns of Concord and Lexington. ...Massachusetts. No longer are there vast expanses of wilderness. Gray Wolf, American Elk, Wolverine and Mountain Lion once occurred here but have long since dis
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  • ...melongena'', a perennial cultivated for its edible [[fruit]]s. In British English it is known by its French name, '''aubergine'''.
    1 KB (179 words) - 17:15, 11 June 2009
  • English translation at ''American Mathematical Society''
    1 KB (160 words) - 13:19, 25 May 2010
  • * ''The Cambridge History of English and American Literature'' (1907-1921). http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/
    814 B (99 words) - 17:44, 15 January 2008
  • ...t also have a great fondness for orally-delivered compositions and prose. American music, particularly from the 1930's forward, is another area of great inter
    765 B (117 words) - 13:09, 17 February 2021
  • ...only to say that the plural should be used. On the other hand, in British English, it is said that "the govenment are about to take action....etc." So I'll g :The plan I was running with was a brief outline of the first English involvement on the island (IE, the Anglo Normans) then move on to the Ulste
    24 KB (3,899 words) - 10:51, 6 October 2010
  • ...ies give a range of translations, so what to put in [[British and American English]]? [[User:Ro Thorpe|Ro Thorpe]] 22:06, 26 April 2009 (UTC) ...first paragraph of the article, a clear statement such as exists in the WP English article about it: "While some studies, including Benveniste's, have claimed
    61 KB (10,178 words) - 20:35, 24 October 2009
  • ...s undergraduate education in the UK. After English language education at [[American University]], he took a master's degree in civil engineering at [[George Wa
    913 B (142 words) - 12:37, 18 October 2013
  • ...bruary, 1940) was a [[philologist]] specialized in early-modern and modern English. He was a [[Shakespeare]] scholar and wrote a number of influential books a ...he founded the institute of ''Amerikanistik und Anglistik'' (American and English Studies). In 1914 Brandl undersigned the [[Manifesto of the 93]].
    1 KB (165 words) - 12:32, 14 September 2013
  • ...l Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry</ref>) or '''aluminum''' ([[American English]]) is a [[Chemical elements|chemical element]], having the [[chemical symb
    1 KB (207 words) - 14:53, 9 December 2020
  • '''Collectables''', or, in American English, ''collectibles'', are items of human manufacture considered worth keeping.
    1 KB (181 words) - 22:46, 19 April 2011
  • *[[Peter Agre]], (1949-), American chemist and doctor, 2003 [[Nobel Prize in Chemistry]] *[[Arthur Aikin]], (1773&ndash;1855), English chemist and mineralogist
    14 KB (1,541 words) - 11:05, 9 June 2009
  • {{r|British and American English}}
    1 KB (149 words) - 22:14, 11 January 2010
  • ...Welsh-, Cornish-, etc.-language authors off in their own categories), or "English-language literature" (with Mark Twain, V.S. Naipaul, etc.)? ...Japanese Lit."), though their "English Literature" article covers works in English by authors from all the British Isles, including Ireland. Then they have "
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  • ...liar to the American buying public that they should not be translated into English for descriptiveness purposes." This test is also applied by courts to deter ...Federal Circuit specifically found that "it is improbable that the average American purchaser would stop and translate '[[wikt:veuve|VEUVE]]' into '[[widow]]'"
    7 KB (1,084 words) - 11:20, 9 June 2009
  • ...ter)|T]] and before [[V (letter)|V]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. The original alphabet in ancient Rome did not distinguish betwe The English name of U is pronounced [ˈjuː], like the words ''you'' and ''ewe''.
    9 KB (1,523 words) - 22:07, 15 February 2016
  • The '''Comité International des Poids et Mesures''' (in American English: ''International Committee for Weights and Measures''), abbreviated '''CIPM
    1 KB (241 words) - 04:07, 17 April 2011
  • The list at present is rather U.S./North American oriented, so lists that cover other areas of the world would be particularl * [http://cfp.english.upenn.edu/ CFP U-Penn] (English and American Literature and Culture)
    22 KB (3,154 words) - 02:30, 15 January 2008
  • ...of years ago by Native Americans. Permanent European settlement began with English settlers at Jamestown in 1607. Tobacco emerged as a profitable export crop ...United States which won their independence from Great Britain during the [[American Revolution]], Virginia produced more national leaders than any state, inclu
    65 KB (9,951 words) - 03:12, 12 October 2013
  • ...(mainly epistemology, logic, and metaphysics), Latin American history, and English syntax. I've studied these areas extensively and I hope to use my knowledge
    2 KB (206 words) - 05:05, 4 May 2008
  • ...cles]]. There is a bug that is not displaying George W. Bush and American English correctly. [[User:Matt Mahlmann|Matt Mahlmann]] 17:21, 2 November 2007 (CDT ...want to then put into the new template would be something like: "Bob Cane, American, September 23, 1940—December 13, 2005" In other words, we could take all
    118 KB (19,562 words) - 16:10, 11 April 2008
  • The '''elevator''' or '''lift''' (in American and Commonwealth English, respectively), is a mechanical device used for vertical transport. There a
    1 KB (216 words) - 13:32, 14 September 2013
  • *Native English and Spanish speaker. *Studied at the American School Foundation in Mexico City.
    394 B (52 words) - 23:56, 26 December 2006
  • '''Abraham Flexner''' (1866-1959 ) was an [[United States of America|American]] [[educator]] and [[author]] whose advocacy of [[higher education]] fundam *The American College (1908)
    2 KB (328 words) - 18:02, 3 November 2010
  • I'm inclined to think this should be in American English--surely we eat many more hot dogs than you do "across the pond," no? ...iant be set by topic and this was shouted down. The article is in Scottish English because that's the variant that I speak, write, was taught and now teach.
    2 KB (245 words) - 20:57, 3 November 2007
  • ...Carnes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Copyright © 1999 by the American Council of Learned Societies.] | language = English
    1 KB (178 words) - 23:44, 30 March 2008
  • ...ntry England), and "English-language literature" (which would also include American, Aussie, Trinidadian, etc.) would all work. So would, say, "Science fiction ..., that wouldn't be necessary; at worst you'd have to merge the articles on American, British, Aussie, Caribbean, etc., lit. into one article, not change hundre
    64 KB (10,463 words) - 23:27, 28 December 2009
  • Should be moved to English: WP calls it [[Vienna New Year's Concert]]. [[User:Ro Thorpe|Ro Thorpe]] 12 ...east, this is my opinion. CZ should try to avoid being to English, or even American, centered.) This is the only clear and consequent strategy. Of course, I al
    2 KB (272 words) - 14:55, 6 January 2010
  • ...e to define standardised language forms either generally (what is Standard English?) or for specific purposes (what style and register is appropriate in an en ...'s Modern English Usage|English Usage]]'' defined the standard for British English for much of the 20th century. The ''Duden'' grammar has a similar status f
    22 KB (3,259 words) - 05:37, 31 August 2008
  • ...riting and editing for newspapers in Texas and in Ohio. He holds an MAT in English from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ...rs he has been a co-presenter at the NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English) conventions in Nashville (2006: Prose techniques in the public classroom)
    1 KB (177 words) - 11:03, 25 February 2021
  • == English literature == ...ted [[Richard Poirier]], and some of his lectures involved Twain and other Americans. (He insisted, by the way, that for a ''nom de plume'', the FULL name HAD
    4 KB (584 words) - 21:56, 21 September 2020
  • ...e ended in divorce. She then married Ernest Simpson, a half-English, half-American shipping executive. A scant three years later, Thelma, Lady Furness, a mis
    2 KB (267 words) - 06:00, 8 January 2008
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} * {{search link|"killometer"|killometer|ns0|ns14|ns100}} is [[American English]]
    6 KB (780 words) - 06:09, 16 February 2010
  • {{r|Australian English}} {{r|British and American English}}
    3 KB (336 words) - 22:31, 30 November 2013
  • '''Diarrhea''' (sometimes [[British and American English#ae and oe become e|spelled]] '''diarrhoea''') is "an increased liquidity or ...diction rule for evaluating patients with abdominal pain and diarrhea. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine 26, no. 4:450-453. {{doi|10.1016/j.ajem.2007.
    2 KB (288 words) - 23:48, 11 June 2010
  • ...ation Singaporean, American-educated homeschool graduate currently reading English language and literature after a 5-year hiatus from high school. ...an to promote awareness e.g. I translate the ancient Chinese classics into English.
    935 B (126 words) - 02:42, 5 April 2010
  • ...nguage|Written]] [[English language|English]] uses the [[Roman alphabet]]. English writing consists of a [[morphophonology|morphophonemic]] [[alphabet]] with ...cent [[loanword|foreign origin]], or to emphasise [[words]] or phrases. In English orthography, this is achieved by ''italics'', '''bold''' or CAPITAL letters
    2 KB (341 words) - 04:44, 6 June 2009
  • ===Native American=== {{r|British and American English}}
    2 KB (217 words) - 23:03, 30 March 2010
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ...h (e.g. [[Nirvana (band)|Nirvana]]'s album, ''[[Nevermind]]'', cf. British English ''[[Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols]]'')
    9 KB (1,447 words) - 00:45, 24 June 2017
  • ...tate)|Ireland]], and maizemeal in [[East Africa]]. Speakers of [[American English]] understand the word ''porridge'' but generally do not employ it, referrin
    2 KB (356 words) - 12:58, 16 October 2010
  • ...ou use Brit. English, then you use 'single quotes' and if you use American English you use "double quotes" -- that's just the way it is. :( [[User:Hayford Pei ...ists like the Churchlands and liberal naturalists like Michael Martin [the American one]). [[User:Tom Morris|Tom Morris]] 16:22, 8 March 2011 (UTC)
    17 KB (2,552 words) - 03:13, 23 March 2011
  • ...America | ELCA]]. He holds a bachelor of arts degree ([[cum laude]]) in [[English]] and [[Theater | Theatre Arts]]. In 1996 Jon entered [[Luther Seminary]] t ...rhard Forde]]. Jon has also greatly enjoyed being a student of English and American literature, and modern poetry. Jon feels his primary interest and calling i
    4 KB (606 words) - 20:45, 15 February 2007

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