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Electromagnetic wave/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Electromagnetic wave.
See also changes related to Electromagnetic wave, or pages that link to Electromagnetic wave or to this page or whose text contains "Electromagnetic wave".

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  • Acceleration [r]: The increase of an objects velocity (or speed) per unit time. [e]
  • Angular momentum (quantum) [r]: A vector operator of which the three components have well-defined commutation relations. [e]
  • Boson [r]: elementary particle with integral spin; composite system consisting of an even number of fermions. [e]
  • Communication [r]: The set of interactive processes that create shared meaning. [e]
  • Displacement current [r]: Time derivative of the electric displacement D; Maxwell's correction to Ampère's law. [e]
  • Electric constant [r]: A physical constant in the International System of Units (SI) relating capacitance to area in classical vacuum with an exact value ε0 = 107/(4πc02) F/m, c0 being the defined value for the speed of light in classical vacuum in the SI units. [e]
  • Electric field [r]: force acting on an electric charge—a vector field. [e]
  • Electromagnetic radiation [r]: a collection of electromagnetic waves, usually of different wavelengths. [e]
  • Electromagnetic spectrum [r]: The range of electromagnetic waves covering all frequencies and wavelengths. [e]
  • Electromagnetism [r]: Phenomena and theories regarding electricity and magnetism. [e]
  • Enrico Fermi [r]: (1901-1954) Italian born nuclear physicist; designer of the first nuclear reactor. [e]
  • Ether (physics) [r]: Medium that can carry electromagnetic waves (obsolete) [e]
  • Faraday's law (electromagnetism) [r]: States that a change in magnetic flux generates an electromotive force (EMF). [e]
  • Fourier transform [r]: Decomposition to the sum or integral of functions. [e]
  • Gaussian units [r]: A centimeter-gram-second system of units often used in electrodynamics and special relativity. [e]
  • Guglielmo Marconi [r]: (1874 - 1937) Italian inventor and pioneer of radio communication. [e]
  • Harmonic oscillator (quantum) [r]: system of single mass in parabolic potential treated quantum mechanically. [e]
  • Hazard from Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance [r]: Recognition of the risks, and mitigating them, of premature actuation of explosive system by high-energy military electromagnetic emissions [e]
  • Helmholtz decomposition [r]: Decomposition of a vector field in a transverse (divergence-free) and a longitudinal (curl-free) component. [e]
  • Hertz [r]: The international (SI) unit of frequency, with units of inverse seconds, commonly called cycles per seocond. [e]
  • Isotope [r]: An atom of a chemical element with a specific number of neutrons and hence a specific nuclear mass, such as carbon-14 (14C). [e]
  • James Clerk Maxwell [r]: (1831 – 1879) Scottish physicist best known for his formulation of electromagnetic theory and the statistical theory of gases. [e]
  • Joule [r]: The SI unit of energy (symbol: J) which is a measure of the capacity to do work or generate heat. [e]
  • Lorentz force [r]: Force on an electrically charged particle that moves through a magnetic and an electric field. [e]
  • Magnetic field [r]: Vector field H caused by permanent magnets, conduction currents, and displacement currents. [e]
  • Maxwell equations [r]: Mathematical equations describing the interrelationship between electric and magnetic fields; dependence of the fields on electric charge- and current- densities. [e]
  • Memory of water [r]: A pseudoscientific concept, according to which water molecules can store information about the kind of molecules they had been in contact with. [e]
  • Molecule [r]: An aggregate of two or more atoms in a definite arrangement held together by chemical bonds. [e]
  • Momentum [r]: mass of a particle times its velocity (a vector). [e]
  • Particle in a box [r]: A system in quantum mechanics used to illustrate important features of quantum mechanics, such as quantization of energy levels and the existence of zero-point energy. [e]
  • Photon [r]: elementary particle with zero rest mass and unit spin associated with the electromagnetic field. [e]
  • Planck's constant [r]: The constant of proportionality relating the energy of a photon to the frequency of that photon, named sfter Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. [e]
  • Polarizability [r]: The ease by which a charge-distribution polarizes; describes the amount of charge separation caused by an electric field. [e]
  • Quantum mechanics [r]: An important branch of physics dealing with the behavior of matter and energy at very small scales. [e]
  • Relative permittivity [r]: A factor describing the polarizability of a material or medium as a proportionality between an electric displacement and an electric field in a dielectric. [e]
  • Resistor [r]: One of the basic components in electrical circuits. [e]
  • Right-hand rule [r]: Rule for the direction of the vector describing a cross product, a torque, or an angular momentum. [e]
  • Second [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See Second (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Signal processing [r]: Extraction of information from complex signals in the presence of noise, generally by conversion of the signals into digital form followed by analysis using various algorithms. [e]
  • Special relativity [r]: Theory of the effects of motion on observations of things such as length, time, mass and energy. The theory is based on the postulates that all laws of physics are the same in all inertial reference systems, and that the vacuum speed of light is a universal constant, independent of the speed of the source. [e]
  • Speed of light [r]: A physical constant c describing the speed of electromagnetic radiation in vacuum. In the International System of Units the metre is the distance light travels in classical vacuum in 1/c seconds, using the defined value c = c0299  792  458 m/s (exact). [e]
  • Vector field [r]: A vector function on the three-dimensional Euclidean space . [e]
  • Visible light [r]: Electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength that is detectable by the human eye. [e]
  • Volt [r]: SI unit of electrical potential; symbol V; 1 V = 1 W/A = 1 J/C. [e]
  • Wave-particle duality [r]: The concept that all matter and energy exhibits both wave-like and particle-like properties. [e]