Ether (physics)/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Ether (physics).
See also changes related to Ether (physics), or pages that link to Ether (physics) or to this page or whose text contains "Ether (physics)".

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  • Aristotle [r]: (384-322 BCE) Ancient Greek philosopher and scientist, and one of the most influential figures in the western world between 350 BCE and the sixteenth century. [e]
  • Christiaan Huygens [r]: (14 April 1629 - 8 June 1695) an internationally renowned Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer. [e]
  • Electromagnetic radiation [r]: a collection of electromagnetic waves, usually of different wavelengths. [e]
  • Electromagnetic wave [r]: A change, periodic in space and time, of an electric field E(r,t) and a magnetic field B(r,t); a stream of electromagnetic waves, referred to as electromagnetic radiation, can be seen as a stream of massless elementary particles, named photons. [e]
  • Ether (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Gravitation [r]: The tendency of objects with mass to accelerate toward each other. [e]
  • Hendrik Antoon Lorentz [r]: Dutch theoretical physicist (1853 - 1928) [e]
  • James Clerk Maxwell [r]: (1831 – 1879) Scottish physicist best known for his formulation of electromagnetic theory and the statistical theory of gases. [e]
  • Scientific method [r]: The concept of systematic inquiry based on hypotheses and their testing in light of empirical evidence. [e]
  • Special relativity [r]: Theory of space and time, based on the postulates that all the laws of physics are equally valid in all frames of reference moving at a uniform velocity and that the speed of light from a uniformly moving source is always the same, regardless of how fast or slow the source or its observer is moving. [e]
  • Speed of light [r]: A physical constant c describing the speed of electromagnetic radiation in vacuum. In the International System of Units the metre is the distance light travels in classical vacuum in 1/c seconds, using the defined value c = c0299  792  458 m/s (exact). [e]