Gravitation/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Gravitation.
See also changes related to Gravitation, or pages that link to Gravitation or to this page or whose text contains "Gravitation".

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  • Acceleration due to gravity [r]: The acceleration of a ponderable object, which is near the surface of the Earth, due to the Earth's gravitational force. [e]
  • Acceleration [r]: The increase of an objects velocity (or speed) per unit time. [e]
  • Air pollution dispersion terminology [r]: Describes and explains the words and technical terms that have a special meaning to workers in the field of air pollution dispersion modeling. [e]
  • Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Angular momentum (classical) [r]: The tendency of a rotating object to resist changes to its rotational motion. [e]
  • Avogadro's number [r]: The number of atoms in 12 gram of carbon-12 atoms in their ground state at rest. [e]
  • Barycentre [r]: The centre of mass of a body or system of particles, a weighted average where certain forces may be taken to act. [e]
  • Black hole [r]: Area of space-time with a gravitational field so intense that its escape velocity is equal to or exceeds the speed of light. [e]
  • Charles-Augustin de Coulomb [r]: (Angoulême June 14, 1736 – Paris August 23, 1806) French physicist known for formulating a law for the force between two electrically charged bodies. [e]
  • Christiaan Huygens [r]: (14 April 1629 - 8 June 1695) an internationally renowned Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer. [e]
  • Coulomb's law [r]: An inverse-square distance law, like Newton's gravitational law, describing the forces acting between electric point charges; also valid for the force between magnetic poles. [e]
  • Ether (physics) [r]: Medium that can carry electromagnetic waves (obsolete) [e]
  • Force [r]: Vector quantity that tends to produce an acceleration of a body in the direction of its application. [e]
  • Galaxy [r]: Gravitationally bound system of stars typically contain ten million to one trillion stars. [e]
  • Internal energy [r]: Energy of a system in absence of interaction of the system with external fields [e]
  • Inverse-square law [r]: A physical law stating that some physical quantity or strength is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of that physical quantity. [e]
  • Isaac Newton [r]: (1642–1727) English physicist and mathematician, best known for his elucidation of the universal theory of gravitation and his development of calculus. [e]
  • Mass [r]: The total amount of a substance, or alternatively, the total energy of a substance. [e]
  • Mechanics [r]: In physics, all theories explaining the behaviour of matter. [e]
  • Milky Way [r]: The Milky Way galaxy which contains our solar system. [e]
  • Physical Review [r]: Highly respected physics scientific journal published by the American Physical Society (APS). [e]
  • Redshift [r]: A term used in astronomy and physics to refer to phenomena causing an increase in the observed wavelength of electromagnetic radiation or an apparent decrease in the observed frequency. [e]
  • Relative permittivity [r]: A factor describing the polarizability of a material or medium as a proportionality between an electric displacement and an electric field in a dielectric. [e]
  • Saturn (planet) [r]: The sixth planet from the Sun in our solar system; named after the Roman god of agriculture and harvest. [e]
  • Science [r]: The organized body of knowledge based on non–trivial refutable concepts that can be verified or rejected on the base of observation and experimentation [e]
  • Solar system [r]: The sun and the planets orbiting it. [e]
  • Tidal force [r]: Gravitational forces acting on an extended body as a result of the varying distance between the source of the gravitational force, and the different parts of the extended body. [e]
  • U.S. customary units [r]: The units of measurement that are currently used in the United States. [e]
  • Work (Physics) [r]: Form of energy transferred to a body by a force. [e]