Coulomb's law/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Coulomb's law.
See also changes related to Coulomb's law, or pages that link to Coulomb's law or to this page or whose text contains "Coulomb's law".

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  • Charles-Augustin de Coulomb [r]: (Angoulême June 14, 1736 – Paris August 23, 1806) French physicist known for formulating a law for the force between two electrically charged bodies. [e]
  • Chemical elements [r]: In one sense, refers to species or types of atoms, each species/type distinguished by the number of protons in the nuclei of the atoms belonging to the species/type, each species/type having a unique number of nuclear protons; in another sense, refers to substances, or pieces of matter, each composed of multiple atoms solely of a single species/type. [e]
  • Coulomb (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Coulomb (unit) [r]: SI unit of electric charge; symbol C; 1 C = 1 A⋅s. [e]
  • Coulomb's law (magnetic) [r]: An inverse-square law for the force between two magnetic monopoles. [e]
  • Dielectric [r]: an insulating, but polarizable, material that can be solid, liquid or gas; its important characterizing property is the relative permittivity (aka dielectric constant). [e]
  • Distribution (mathematics) [r]: Objects which generalize functions, used to formulate generalized solutions of partial differential equations. [e]
  • Divergence [r]: A first order differential vector operator acting on a vector field resulting in a scalar function. [e]
  • Electric constant [r]: A physical constant in the International System of Units (SI) relating capacitance to area in classical vacuum with an exact value ε0 = 107/(4πc02) F/m, c0 being the defined value for the speed of light in classical vacuum in the SI units. [e]
  • Electric field [r]: force acting on an electric charge—a vector field. [e]
  • Electromagnetism [r]: Phenomena and theories regarding electricity and magnetism. [e]
  • Energy (science) [r]: A measurable physical quantity of a system which can be expressed in joules (the metric unit for a quantity of energy) or other measurement units such as ergs, calories, watt-hours or Btu. [e]
  • Gauss' law (electrostatics) [r]: Relates the surface integral of the electric displacement through a closed surface to the electric charge enveloped by the closed surface. [e]
  • Gaussian units [r]: A centimeter-gram-second system of units often used in electrodynamics and special relativity. [e]
  • Gravitation [r]: The tendency of objects with mass to accelerate toward each other. [e]
  • Green's function [r]: Auxiliary function in the theory of linear differential equations; integral operator with Green function as kernel is the inverse of a linear differential operator. [e]
  • Hydrogen-like atom [r]: An atom, excluding hydrogen itself, with only one electron, having charge +(Z-1), where Z = atomic number. [e]
  • Intermolecular forces [r]: Non-covalent forces between atoms and molecules; often synonymous with Van der Waals forces. [e]
  • Inverse-square law [r]: A physical law stating that some physical quantity or strength is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of that physical quantity. [e]
  • James Clerk Maxwell [r]: (1831 – 1879) Scottish physicist best known for his formulation of electromagnetic theory and the statistical theory of gases. [e]
  • Maxwell equations [r]: Mathematical equations describing the interrelationship between electric and magnetic fields; dependence of the fields on electric charge- and current- densities. [e]
  • Molecular Hamiltonian [r]: Quantum mechanical operator describing the energy associated with motions and interactions of the electrons and nuclei that constitute a molecule. [e]
  • Multipole expansion (interaction) [r]: A mathematical series representing a function that depends on angles, and frequently used in the study of electromagnetic, and gravitational fields, where the fields at distant points are given in terms of sources in a small region. [e]
  • Multipole expansion of electric field [r]: an expansion in terms of powers of 1/R of an electric potential outside a charge distribution; R is the distance of a point outside to a point inside the charge distribution. [e]
  • Polarizability [r]: The ease by which a charge-distribution polarizes; describes the amount of charge separation caused by an electric field. [e]
  • Relative permittivity [r]: A factor describing the polarizability of a material or medium as a proportionality between an electric displacement and an electric field in a dielectric. [e]
  • Statcoulomb [r]: Unit of electric charge in cgs-esu units: 1 statC = C/(10⋅c), with c the speed of light in m/s. [e]
  • Vector field [r]: A vector function on the three-dimensional Euclidean space . [e]