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Etiology/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Etiology.
See also changes related to Etiology, or pages that link to Etiology or to this page or whose text contains "Etiology".

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  • Allopathy [r]: An essentially discredited medical theory of the 19th century and earlier, which focused on using drugs, sometimes in high doses, that produced the opposite to an undesired symptom; they were not targeted on etiology [e]
  • Alternative medicine (theories) [r]: Overview of social, cultural and philosophical perspectives of concepts relating to human health and healing offering links to more detailed discussions [e]
  • Anemia [r]: A condition characterized by insufficient circulating and effective hemoglobin in blood to support normal physiology. [e]
  • Breast cancer [r]: Cancer of the glandular breast tissue. [e]
  • Disease [r]: A condition of the body in which one or more of its components fail to operate properly, resulting in disability, pain or other forms of suffering, or behavioral aberrations. [e]
  • Flexner Report [r]: Influential report on medical school curricula in the USA (1910), which transformed it to one based on scientific preparation and formal education. [e]
  • Graduate medical education [r]: A medical degree, most often a bachelor's degree, from a school or college of medicine, usually combined with practical clinical experience. [e]
  • Homeopathy [r]: System of alternative medicine involving administration of highly diluted substances with the intention to stimulate the body's natural healing processes, not considered proven by mainstream science. [e]
  • Infant colic [r]: A medical term for persistent and inconsolable crying by healthy infants, who are usually between the ages of two and sixteen weeks. [e]
  • Infectious disease [r]: In broad terms, diseases caused by living organisms; also a subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the treatment of such diseases [e]
  • Medical diagnosis [r]: The process of combining observations, tests, and disciplined decision mechanisms to determine the cause(s) of a patient's distress [e]
  • Medically unexplained physical symptoms [r]: Symptoms for which the treating physician, other healthcare providers, and research scientists have found no medical cause. [e]
  • Nursing [r]: A health sciences profession concerned with promoting and optimizing health; minimizing illness, morbidity, and mortality; alleviation of suffering through understanding its causes and means of alleviating it; and advocating the appropriate health care of individuals, families, communities, and populations [e]
  • Randomized controlled trial [r]: Method used to ensure objectivity when testing medical treatments. [e]
  • Retrospective studies [r]: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons. [e]
  • Samuel Hahnemann [r]: (1755 - 1843), physician who founded homoeopathic medicine. [e]
  • Symptom [r]: A subjective description of an abnormal state, recounted by a patient, which is informative, but different from the objective result of a sign. [e]
  • Syndrome [r]: Group of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, psychological disorder, or other abnormal condition. [e]
  • Vaccination [r]: A preventative health measure that can confer immunity to an infectious disease, without requiring that the vaccinated individual actually contract the disease. [e]