Disease/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Disease.
See also changes related to Disease, or pages that link to Disease or to this page or whose text contains "Disease".

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Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/Disease. Needs checking by a human.

  • Adiposopathy [r]: The dysfunction of fat cells. [e]
  • Africa [r]: Continent stretching over the equator, hosting deserts, tropical jungles and savannah as well as over fifty nations; population about 900,000,000. [e]
  • Alcoholism [r]: Chronic addiction to alcohol. [e]
  • Alcohol [r]: A chemical compound that contains a hydroxy group (OH). [e]
  • Alternative medicine (theories) [r]: Overview of social, cultural and philosophical perspectives of concepts relating to human health and healing offering links to more detailed discussions [e]
  • American Thoracic Society [r]: Professional and scientific society of respiratory, critical care and sleep medicine. [e]
  • Anatomy [r]: The branch of morphology given to the study of the structure of members of the biological kingdom Animalia (animals). [e]
  • Antiemetic agent [r]: Medications used to prevent nausea or vomiting. [e]
  • Apoptosis [r]: Programmed cell death by which cells in a multicellular organism undergo a controlled death. [e]
  • Autism [r]: Developmental disability that results from a disorder of the human central nervous system. [e]
  • Beekeeping [r]: The management and maintenance of colonies of honeybees. [e]
  • Bee [r]: Flying insects of the order hymenoptera, closely related to wasps and ants. [e]
  • Benjamin Rush [r]: (1745 - 1813) American physician, educator, chemist, writer, and Founding Father who is known as the "Father of American Psychiatry." [e]
  • Bioavailability [r]: An objective measurement of the availability, of target tissues, of the active ingredient of a drug or nutrient administered to a living organism [e]
  • Biologically based health practices [r]: Methods in conventional medicine, complementary and alternative medicine and traditional medicine that share the characteristic that substances used in the practice come from plants or animals [e]
  • Biophysics [r]: The study of forces and energies in biological systems. [e]
  • Botany [r]: The study of plants, algae and fungi (mycology). [e]
  • Brain morphometry [r]: The quantitative study of structures in the brain, their differences between individuals, correlations with brain function, and changes of these characteristics over time. [e]
  • Brain size [r]: Umbrella term for various measures of how big a brain is. [e]
  • Brain [r]: The core unit of a central nervous system. [e]
  • Chesapeake Bay [r]: One of the major estuaries of the eastern seaboard of the United States. [e]
  • Circulatory system [r]: Organ system that passes nutrients, gases, hormones, blood cells, nitrogen waste products, etc. to and from cells in the body. [e]
  • Coffee [r]: One of the most popular and widely consumed beverages in the world today. [e]
  • Cortical thickness [r]: The combined thickness of the cerebral cortex layers. [e]
  • Cryonics [r]: The low-temperature preservation of corpses in the vague hope that resuscitation may eventually become possible in the future. [e]
  • Death [r]: State of thermodynamic equilibrium achieved after the end of life. [e]
  • Diagnostic imaging [r]: The ensemble of methods used to generate visual representations of objects of clinical interest. [e]
  • Dinosaur [r]: widely distributed and diverse group of generally large reptiles that lived from approximately 215 to 65 million years ago. [e]
  • Drug discovery [r]: Process by which pharmaceuticals are discovered and/or designed. [e]
  • Drugs banned from the Olympics [r]: Substances prohibited for use by athletes prior to, and during competing in the Olympics. [e]
  • Drug [r]: Substance taken to alter bodily functions, to relieve symptoms, cure or prevent disease, or to cause euphoria. [e]
  • Endocrinology [r]: Generically, the study of glands and the hormonal regulation of physiology; also the subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with diseases of the endocrine system [e]
  • Epidemiology [r]: The branch of demography that studies patterns of disease in human or animal populations. [e]
  • Etiology [r]: Study of causation, or origination, usually applied in medicine to the causes of disease. [e]
  • Faith healing [r]: Use of faith and spirit to cure disease. [e]
  • Fossilization (palaeontology) [r]: The set of geological processes that convert organic remains into fossils. [e]
  • Fungus [r]: A eukaryotic organism, classified into the kingdom Fungi, that is heterotrophic and digest their food externally, and may be a yeast, mold, or mushroom. [e]
  • Genotype [r]: Genetic makeup, as distinguished from the physical appearance, of an organism or a group of organisms, based on a combination of alleles located on homologous chromosomes that determines a specific characteristic or trait. [e]
  • Gerontology [r]: Biomedical, sociological and psychological study of aging. [e]
  • Gyrification [r]: The folding process during brain development, or the extent of folding. [e]
  • Health science [r]: The helping professions that use applied science to improve health and to treat disease. [e]
  • Health [r]: The default state of an organism under optimal conditions, a state characterized by the absence of disease and by the slowest natural rate of senescing. [e]
  • Hippocrates [r]: (c. 460 – 370 BCE) A physician, who revolutionized the practice of medicine by transforming it from its mythical, superstitious, magical and supernatural roots to a science based on observation and reason. [e]
  • Human anatomy [r]: The study of shapes and structures of and within the human body. [e]
  • Hypertension [r]: A multisystem disease whose hallmark is the elevation of blood pressure. [e]
  • Immunology [r]: The study of all aspects of the immune system in all animals. [e]
  • Infection [r]: Invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in body tissues, especially that causing local cellular injury due to competitive metabolism, toxins, intracellular replication or antigen–antibody response. [e]
  • Infectious disease [r]: In broad terms, diseases caused by living organisms; also a subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the treatment of such diseases [e]
  • Insect [r]: One of numerous small arthropod animals with six legs, an exoskeleton that grows by molting, and oftentimes wings. [e]
  • Integrative medicine [r]: Organized health care that involves willing cooperation between mainstream and complementary medicine [e]
  • Life extension [r]: Medical and non-medical attempts to slow down or reverse the processes of aging, to extend both the maximum and average lifespan. [e]
  • Maximum life span [r]: Measure of the maximum amount of time one or more members of a group has been observed to survive between birth and death. [e]
  • Medical education [r]: Learning process of being a medical practitioner, either the initial training to become a doctor or further training thereafter (including residency). [e]
  • Medication [r]: A licensed drug taken to cure or reduce symptoms of an illness or medical condition. [e]
  • Medicine [r]: The study of health and disease of the human body. [e]
  • Michel Foucault [r]: (1926-84) French philosopher and historian who tried to show power relations behind social institutions. [e]
  • Microorganism [r]: A 'germ', an organism that is too small to be seen individually with the naked eye. [e]
  • Mobile DNA [r]: Blocks of DNA that are able to move and insert into new locations throughout the genome without needing DNA sequence similarity or requiring the process of homologous recombination to enable movement. [e]
  • Multiple sclerosis [r]: A chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS). [e]
  • Neuroimaging [r]: A group of techniques used to visualize structure and function of nervous systems, especially the vertebrate brain. [e]
  • Neurology [r]: The medical specialty concerned with evaluating the nervous system and the other system that it affects, and the treatment of nervous system disorders. [e]
  • Nobel Prize [r]: A prestigious annual prize awarded according to the will of Swedish chemist and entrepreneur Alfred Nobel in the categories Peace, Literature, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Physics. [e]
  • Organism [r]: An individual living individual: a complex, adaptive physical system that acts a integrated unit that sustains metabolism and reproduces progeny that resemble it. [e]
  • Pathology [r]: The medical specialty that is expert in the use of laboratory methods to support clinicians in diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis [e]
  • Penguin [r]: Large-bodied flightless birds found from their southernmost range on Antarctica to north on the Galapagos Islands at the equator. [e]
  • Pharmacy [r]: A area of heath science that uses principles of chemistry and biology to study the interaction of drugs with biological systems and optimize drug therapy. [e]
  • Physical examination [r]: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality. [e]
  • Pilus [r]: Hairlike appendage found on the surface of many Gram-negative bacteria, shorter, thinner and straighter than flagella. [e]
  • Pollinator decline [r]: The reduction in abundance of pollinators in many ecosystems worldwide. [e]
  • Polymicrogyria [r]: A disorder in which the brain surface resembles that of a road paved with cobblestones. [e]
  • Psychiatry [r]: The subfield of health sciences concerned with mental disorders. [e]
  • Ptolemy [r]: (2nd century AD) Egyptian astronomer and geographer whose main work, the Almagest, a compendium of contemporary astronomical knowledge, was in use into the 15th century. [e]
  • Radiology [r]: A physician specialty with a core competence in obtaining and diagnosing by means of instruments that receive energy transmitted through the body; there are a number of subspecialties. [e]
  • Rejuvenation (aging) [r]: Hypothetical reversal of the aging process, aiming to repair the damage that is associated with aging or replacement of damaged tissue with new tissue. [e]
  • Rheumatology [r]: Medical specialty that deals with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of connective tissue diseases; a subspecialty of internal medicine [e]
  • Schizophrenia [r]: A mental disorder characterized by impaired perception of the individual's environment. [e]
  • Single-nucleotide polymorphism [r]: A DNA sequence variation across chromosomes within an individual or a species, involving only a single base change. [e]
  • Skin [r]: Membranous protective tissue forming the external covering or integument of an animal and consisting in vertebrates of the epidermis and dermis, and capable of receiving external sensory stimuli. [e]
  • Surgery [r]: Field of medicine that focuses on operative treatments of the body. [e]
  • Vesalius [r]: (1514 - 1564) Flemish physician who revolutionized the field of anatomy by laying the groundwork for a new, observation-based methodology, using dissections of human cadavers. [e]
  • William Osler [r]: physician, educator, medical philosopher, and historian from Canada, often called the Father of Modern Medicine. [e]
  • Work [r]: Form of energy transferred to a body by a force. [e]
  • Yersinia pestis [r]: Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, that can infect humans and other animals in three main forms: pneumonic, septicemic, and the notorious bubonic plagues. [e]