Roman alphabet/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Roman alphabet.
See also changes related to Roman alphabet, or pages that link to Roman alphabet or to this page or whose text contains "Roman alphabet".

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  • A (letter) [r]: The first letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Acute accent [r]: A diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Greek and Cyrillic scripts. [e]
  • Alphabet [r]: Writing system in which symbols - single or multiple letters, such as <a> or <ch> - represent phonemes (significant 'sounds') of a language. [e]
  • Aragonese language [r]: Romance language mainly spoken in northern Aragon. [e]
  • B (letter) [r]: The second letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Belarussian language [r]: Slavic language mainly spoken in Belarus. [e]
  • Boomerang [r]: Traditionally a piece of wood that was carved and twisted so that when it was thrown correctly it would return to the thrower. [e]
  • C (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • C (letter) [r]: The third letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Cherokee language [r]: An Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people which uses a unique syllabary writing system. [e]
  • Culture of Japan [r]: Set of traditions, pastimes, artistic expression, use of language, belief systems and so on that distinguishes Japan from other nations. [e]
  • Cyrillic alphabet [r]: The alphabet used for a number of languages, mostly Slavonic ones, including Russian, Bulgarian and Serbian. [e]
  • D (letter) [r]: The fourth letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Dutch language [r]: West-Germanic language spoken by roughly 20 million people in the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, and the Netherlands Antilles. [e]
  • E (letter) [r]: The fifth letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • English alphabet [r]: A Latin-based alphabet consisting of 28 letters ie. 26 standard letters plus two print ligatures æ and œ. [e]
  • Esperanto [r]: Artificial language created by L.L. Zamenhof in the late 19th century. [e]
  • F (letter) [r]: The sixth letter of the English alphabet. Its name is pronounced eff. [e]
  • Francoprovençal language [r]: Romance language spoken in central eastern France, western Switzerland and northwestern Italy. [e]
  • French language [r]: A Romance language spoken in northwestern Europe (mainly in France, Belgium, Switzerland), in Canada and in many other countries. [e]
  • G (letter) [r]: The seventh letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • GH [r]: A digraph (a two-letter grapheme) used with various different values in a number of languages using the Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Gamma (Greek letter) [r]: The third letter of the Greek alphabet, written (upper-case) or (lower-case). [e]
  • German language [r]: A West-Germanic language, the official language of Germany, Austria and Liechtenstein, one of several official languages in Switzerland and Belgium, and also spoken in Italy and Denmark. [e]
  • Germanic languages [r]: Branch of the Indo-European language family, initially spoken in northern and central Europe and now spread over many parts of the world. [e]
  • Greek alphabet [r]: Set of twenty-four letters that has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC. [e]
  • H (letter) [r]: The eighth letter in the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • HTML [r]: A set of tags for marking up the content of a web page into distinct sections. [e]
  • Hungarian language [r]: The official language of Hungary. [e]
  • I (letter) [r]: The ninth letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet [r]: System of phonetic notation based on the Latin alphabet, devised by the International Phonetic Association as a standardized representation of the sounds of spoken language. [e]
  • Irish language [r]: A Goidelic Celtic language spoken mainly on the island of Ireland and in Canada. [e]
  • Italian language [r]: A Romance language spoken in Italy and Switzerland. [e]
  • J (letter) [r]: The tenth letter in the basic modern Latin alphabet, and historically the last of the 26 letters to be added. [e]
  • Japanese language [r]: (日本語 Nihongo), Japonic language spoken mostly in Japan; Japonic family's linguistic relationship to other tongues yet to be established, though Japanese may be related to Korean; written in a combination of Chinese-derived characters (漢字 kanji) and native hiragana (ひらがな) and katakana (カタカナ) scripts; about 125,000,000 native speakers worldwide. [e]
  • K (letter) [r]: The eleventh letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • L (letter) [r]: The twelfth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Letter (alphabet) [r]: Symbol in an alphabetic script, usually denoting one or more phonemes; for example, in the English alphabet the letter <a> can represent the phoneme /æ/ as in mat and /eɪ/ as in mate. [e]
  • Linguistic prescriptivism [r]: The laying down or prescribing of normative rules for the use of a language, or the making of recommendations for effective language usage. [e]
  • M (letter) [r]: The thirteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Middle English [r]: English language as it was from about the middle of the eleventh century until the end of the fifteenth century. [e]
  • Minimal pair [r]: Two words differing by only one unit of sound, or phoneme. [e]
  • N (letter) [r]: The fourteenth letter in the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Norwegian language [r]: North Germanic language spoken primarily in Norway; 4.7 million speakers. [e]
  • Number [r]: One of the fundamental concepts of mathematics, used for such purposes as counting, ordering, and measuring. [e]
  • O (letter) [r]: The fifteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Occitan language [r]: Romance language spoken in Occitania. [e]
  • Occitania [r]: Area of southwestern Europe were the Occitan language is spoken. [e]
  • Oceania [r]: A major geographical region of the planet Earth, mostly in the southern hemisphere, consisting of Australasia (the Australian continent and New Zealand), Micronesia, Melanesia and Polynesia. [e]
  • Orthography of Irish [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • P (letter) [r]: The sixteenth letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Palatalization [r]: An umbrella term for several processes of assimilation in phonetics and phonology, by which the articulation of a consonant is changed under the influence of a preceding or following front vowel or a palatal or palatalized consonant. [e]
  • Portuguese language [r]: An Iberian Romance language, of the Indo-European family. [e]
  • Q (letter) [r]: The seventeenth letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • R (letter) [r]: The 18th letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • S (letter) [r]: The 19th letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Schwa [r]: Mid-central neutral vowel, typically occurring in unstressed syllables and, in some systems of phonetic transcription, a stressed mid-central vowel. [e]
  • Serbian language [r]: Slavic language belonging to the Serbo-Croatian diasystem, spoken by Serbian people and Montenegrin people, mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo. [e]
  • Slavic languages [r]: Branch of the Indo-European language family, spoken in eastern Europe and Siberia. [e]
  • Spanish language [r]: A Romance language widely spoken in Spain, its current and former territories, and the United States of America. [e]
  • T (letter) [r]: The 20th letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Tajik alphabet [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Turkish language [r]: Turkic language mainly spoken in Turkey and among Turkish-speaking populations in several countries. [e]
  • U (letter) [r]: The twenty-first letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Unicode [r]: Character encoding standard designed to formalize a universal representation of alphanumeric symbols. [e]
  • V (letter) [r]: The twenty-second letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Volga Tatar language [r]: Turkic language mainly spoken in Tatarstan by Volga Tatar people. [e]
  • W (letter) [r]: The twenty-third letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Writing [r]: The process of recording thoughts or speech in a visually or haptically retrievable manner. [e]
  • Written language [r]: The communication and representation of a language by means of a writing system. [e]
  • X (letter) [r]: The twenty-fourth letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Y (letter) [r]: The twenty-fifth and penultimate letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Z (letter) [r]: The twenty-sixth and last letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Ð, ð (eth) [r]: (lowercase: ð) Letter called "eth", used in some variants of the Latin alphabet, especially in Icelandic, Faeroese, Old and Middle English. [e]
  • Þ [r]: Letter of the Runic alphabet, called "thorn", also used in some variants of the Latin alphabet (Icelandic, Old and Middle English). [e]
  • Đ, đ (D with stroke) [r]: (lowercase: đ) Letter used in some variants of the Latin alphabet, especially in Vietnamese, Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian. [e]