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French language/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about French language.
See also changes related to French language, or pages that link to French language or to this page or whose text contains "French language".

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Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/French language. Needs checking by a human.

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