German language/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about German language.
See also changes related to German language, or pages that link to German language or to this page or whose text contains "German language".

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Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/German language. Needs checking by a human.

  • Abraham Emanuel Fröhlich [r]: (1796-1865) Swiss theologian and poet. [e]
  • Action T4 [r]: Secret program in Nazi Germany in which Adolf Hitler's regime killed up to 250,000 people with disabilities. [e]
  • Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Amish [r]: A Christian people centered mainly in the United States and noted for their rejection of much of modern culture and technology. [e]
  • Austria [r]: Federal republic in central Europe (population c. 8.2 million; capital Vienna), bordered to the north by Germany and the Czech Republic; to the south by Italy and Slovenia; to the west by Switzerland and Liechtenstein; and to the east by Hungary and Slovakia. [e]
  • Beyond Recall [r]: Entitled Unwiederbringlich in its original German which was first published in 1892, Beyond Recall is a 20th-century translation of the novel by German writer Theodor Fontane. [e]
  • Bread [r]: A kind of food made from heated dough. [e]
  • C (letter) [r]: The third letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Carinthia (province) [r]: A province in the north of Slovenia. [e]
  • Carinthia (state) [r]: The southernmost Austrian state. [e]
  • Catalog of artworks known in English by a foreign title [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Cherokee language [r]: An Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people which uses a unique syllabary writing system. [e]
  • Code-switching [r]: Linguistics term denoting the concurrent use of more than one language, or language variety, in conversation. [e]
  • Danube River [r]: Europe's second longest river, about 2860 km long, second only to the Volga River. [e]
  • Dialect continuum [r]: Range of dialects spoken across a large geographical area, differing only slightly between areas that are geographically close, and gradually decreasing in mutual intelligibility as the distances become greater. [e]
  • Drava River [r]: River in Central Europe, a 750km long tributary of the Danube, originating in the South Tirol in Italy. [e]
  • Dutch language [r]: West-Germanic language spoken by roughly 20 million people in the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, and the Netherlands Antilles. [e]
  • England [r]: The largest and southernmost country in the United Kingdom, and location of the largest city and seat of government, London; population about 51,000,000. [e]
  • English language [r]: A West Germanic language widely spoken in the United Kingdom, its territories and dependencies, Commonwealth countries and former colonial outposts of the British Empire; has developed the status of a global language. [e]
  • Esperanto [r]: Artificial language created by L.L. Zamenhof in the late 19th century. [e]
  • Francoprovençal language [r]: Romance language spoken in central eastern France, western Switzerland and northwestern Italy. [e]
  • French language [r]: A Romance language spoken in northwestern Europe (mainly in France, Belgium, Switzerland), in Canada and in many other countries. [e]
  • German (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • German dialects [r]: Dialect dominated by the geographical spread of the High German consonant shift, and the dialect continuum that connects the German with the Dutch language. [e]
  • Germanic languages [r]: Branch of the Indo-European language family, initially spoken in northern and central Europe and now spread over many parts of the world. [e]
  • Germany [r]: Federal republic in central Europe (population c. 82.4 million; capital Berlin), with the North Sea, Denmark and the Baltic Sea to the north; Poland and the Czech Republic to the east; Switzerland and Austria to the south; and France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west; founding member of the European Union. [e]
  • Glottopedia [r]: An on-line encylopedia project for linguistics, the study of language. [e]
  • Hyphen [r]: A line (-), shorter than a dash (–), used to join words, as in 'word-joining is easy where hyphens are abundant'. [e]
  • Indo-European languages [r]: A group of several hundred languages, including the majority of languages spoken in Europe, the Plateau of Iran and the subcontinent of India, that share a considerable common vocabulary and linguistic features. [e]
  • Integer [r]: The positive natural numbers (1, 2, 3, …), their negatives (−1, −2, −3, ...) and the number zero. [e]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet [r]: System of phonetic notation based on the Latin alphabet, devised by the International Phonetic Association as a standardized representation of the sounds of spoken language. [e]
  • Jacob Pavlovich Adler [r]: International star of Yiddish theater in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [e]
  • Japanese language [r]: (日本語 Nihongo), Japonic language spoken mostly in Japan; Japonic family's linguistic relationship to other tongues yet to be established, though Japanese may be related to Korean; written in a combination of Chinese-derived characters (漢字 kanji) and native hiragana (ひらがな) and katakana (カタカナ) scripts; about 125,000,000 native speakers worldwide. [e]
  • Knight [r]: Term used in the Middle Ages for a warrior of noble ancestry. [e]
  • Korean language [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Language planning [r]: In sociolinguistics, the name for any political attempt to change the status of a language in some way or develop new ways of using it, e.g. a government devising laws to promote a language, or scholars producing an official dictionary; the former is status planning (changing the political recognition of a language), the latter corpus planning (changing the way a language is used). [e]
  • Latin America [r]: The region of the Americas that shares a common tradition and historical heritage of European colonization, mostly Iberian. [e]
  • Latin alphabet [r]: Most widely used alphabet, the standard script of most languages that originated in Europe, where it developed in ancient Rome before 600 BC from the Etruscan alphabet (in turn derived from the Greek alphabet). [e]
  • Liechtenstein [r]: A doubly landlocked alpine microstate in Western Europe, bordered by Switzerland to the west and south and by Austria to the east. [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Martha Young-Scholten [r]: linguist specialising in the phonology and syntax of second language acquisition (SLA); senior lecturer at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. [e]
  • Mathematics [r]: The study of quantities, structures, their relations, and changes thereof. [e]
  • Media [r]: The embodiment or transmission of information, as with the arts, or radio, television, newspapers, magazines, and internet, considered collectively. [e]
  • Middle High German [r]: Period in the history of the German language between 1100 and 1400, which is preceded by Old High German and followed by Early New High German. [e]
  • Natural language [r]: A communication system based on sequences of acoustic, visual or tactile symbols that serve as units of meaning. [e]
  • Noun class [r]: System which categorises and marks the nouns of a language according to their meaning, form or pronunciation; commonly known as 'grammatical gender', but many languages have several noun classes. [e]
  • O. Henry [r]: Pen name of William Sydney Porter (1862–1910), American author of some 400 short stories. [e]
  • Old High German [r]: The earliest recorded historical stage of development of those central and southern dialects of German that participated in the Second or High German Consonant Shift and which came to form the basis for Modern Standard High German. [e]
  • Old Saxon [r]: The common name given to the earliest stage of historical development of those German dialects spoken by Germanic tribes belonging to the Saxon federation, and which did not participate in the Second or High German Consonant Shift. [e]
  • Palatalization [r]: An umbrella term for several processes of assimilation in phonetics and phonology, by which the articulation of a consonant is changed under the influence of a preceding or following front vowel or a palatal or palatalized consonant. [e]
  • Paracelsus [r]: (1493-1541) An early Renaissance alchemist, philosopher and physician credited with founding the modern fields of pharmacology and toxicology. [e]
  • Project Gutenberg [r]: A volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works, primarily the full texts of public domain books. [e]
  • Proto-language [r]: Language that is the recorded or hypothetical ancestor of another language or group of languages. [e]
  • Quantum mechanics [r]: An important branch of physics dealing with the behavior of matter and energy at very small scales. [e]
  • Romansh language [r]: Romance language spoken in the Graubünden canton of eastern Switzerland; one of the official languages of the country, with about 35,000 speakers. [e]
  • Rudy Demotte [r]: A Belgian socialist politician appointed Minister-President of Wallonia since July 19, 2007. [e]
  • Russian language [r]: Widely-used member of the Slavic languages, written in the Cyrillic alphabet and spoken across Eurasia. [e]
  • Sava River [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Second Consonant Shift [r]: A sound change that took place in around AD 500 and which affected the southern or High German dialects. In these dialects initial, medial, and final West-Germanic */p, t, k/ shifted to fricatives and affricates. [e]
  • South Africa [r]: The southernmost African nation; population about 50,000,000. [e]
  • Stephen Krashen [r]: emeritus professor of education at the University of Southern California; his research concerns second language acquisition (SLA), bilingual education, literacy and neurolinguistics. [e]
  • Strasbourg [r]: Capital of Alsace in France. [e]
  • Switzerland [r]: A country in western Europe known for its banking industry and for being a neutral country since early 19th century. [e]
  • Syllable [r]: Unit of organisation in phonology that divides speech sounds or sign language movements into groups to which phonological rules may apply. [e]
  • Søren Kierkegaard [r]: (May 5, 1813 – November 11, 1855) was a 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian, generally recognized as the first existentialist philosopher. [e]
  • Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus [r]: 1921 book containing the early philosophical work of Ludwig Wittgenstein. [e]
  • Vienna (Austria) [r]: Capital city of Austria, in the northeastern part of the country on the Danube River. [e]
  • Vienna Circle [r]: Group of philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians formed in the 1920s that met regularly in Vienna to investigate scientific language and scientific method. [e]
  • Voicing (linguistics) [r]: Either the physical production of vibration by the vocal folds as part of articulation, or the potential phonological distinction this allows, i.e. the distinct difference between units such as [b] and [p] in many languages. [e]
  • Vowel [r]: Speech sound with relatively unhindered airflow; different vowels are articulated mainly through tongue movements at the palatal and velar regions of the mouth, and are usually voiced (i.e. involve vocal fold movement). [e]
  • Wallonia [r]: Southern, mainly French speaking, part of Belgium. [e]
  • Wikipedia [r]: An online encyclopedia in every major language, open to anonymous editing by anyone. [e]
  • Yiddish language [r]: West Germanic language commonly spoken by people of Jewish heritage originating from Central and Eastern Europe and now settled in several parts of the World. [e]
  • Zeppelin NT [r]: Class of semi-rigid airships being manufactured since the 1990s by the German company Zeppelin Luftschifftechnik GmbH (ZLT) in Friedrichshafen, Germany. [e]