Natural environment/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Natural environment.
See also changes related to Natural environment, or pages that link to Natural environment or to this page or whose text contains "Natural environment".

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  • Accidental release source terms [r]: The mathematical equations that estimate the rate at which accidental releases of air pollutants into the atmosphere may occur at industrial facilities. [e]
  • Air pollutant concentrations [r]: Methods for conversion of air pollutant concentrations. [e]
  • Architecture [r]: The art and technique of designing and constructing buildings to fulfill both practical and aesthetic purposes. [e]
  • Atmosphere [r]: The layers of gas surrounding stars and planets. [e]
  • Bacteria [r]: A major group of single-celled microorganisms. [e]
  • Beijing [r]: Capital city of China (pop. 13,831,900). [e]
  • Biodiversity [r]: The study of the range of life forms in a given ecosystem. [e]
  • Boiling point [r]: The temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the external environmental pressure surrounding the liquid and the liquid initiates boiling. [e]
  • Built environment [r]: The man-made surroundings that provide the setting for human activity. [e]
  • Chemical engineering [r]: The field of engineering that deals with industrial and natural processes involving the chemical, physical or biological transformation of matter or energy into forms useful for mankind, economically and safely without compromising the environment [e]
  • Clean Air Act (U.S.) [r]: A law enacted by the U.S. Congress that defines the responsibilities of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for protecting and improving the nation's air quality and the stratospheric ozone layer. [e]
  • Earth science [r]: The study of the components and processes of the planet Earth. [e]
  • Ecological Indian [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Ecology [r]: The study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and how they are affected by the environment. [e]
  • Ecosystem [r]: A space in which multiple biological species interact. [e]
  • Environment (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Environmental chemistry [r]: The scientific study of the chemical and biochemical phenomena that occurs in natural places. [e]
  • Environmental engineering [r]: A field of engineering devoted to remediation of all forms of pollution. [e]
  • Environmental geography [r]: Examines interlinkages between human and natural systems. [e]
  • European Environment Agency [r]: An agency of the European Union (EU) established as a major source of information and data for developing, adopting, implementing and evaluating environmental policy by member European countries. [e]
  • Geography [r]: Study of the surface of the Earth and the activities of humanity upon it. [e]
  • Global warming [r]: The increase in the average temperature of the Earth's near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. [e]
  • Habitat [r]: Place where an organism or a biological population normally lives or occurs. [e]
  • Human [r]: Bipedal mammalian species native to most continents and sharing a common ape ancestor with chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans; notable for evolving language and adapting its habitat to its own needs. [e]
  • Landscape ecology [r]: Science of studying and improving the relationship between spatial pattern and ecological processes on a multitude of landscape scales and organizational levels. [e]
  • Malthusianism [r]: A theory in demography which holds that population expands faster than food supplies and famine will result unless steps are taken to reduce population growth. [e]
  • Marine biology [r]: The study of life in the seas and oceans. [e]
  • Metapopulation [r]: A group of spatially separated populations of the same species which interact at some level. [e]
  • Montreal Biosphere [r]: A Montreal natural science museum, housed inside a geodesic dome designed by Buckminster Fuller for the U.S. Pavilion at Expo 67. [e]
  • Natural selection [r]: The differential survival and/or reproduction of classes of entities that differ in one or more characteristics [e]
  • Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment [r]: A research institute that is an independent agency of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport and is a recognised leading center of expertise in the fields of health, nutrition and environmental protection. [e]
  • OCLC [r]: A nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization, founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. [e]
  • Phage ecology [r]: Study of the interaction of bacteriophages with their environments. [e]
  • Pollutant [r]: Any substance introduced into the environment that adversely affects the usefulness of a natural resource or the health of humans, animals, or ecosystems. [e]
  • Population ecology [r]: Sub-field of ecology concerning dynamics of species populations and their interactions with the environment. [e]
  • Population [r]: Collection of inter-breeding organisms of a particular species, in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. [e]
  • Radiochemistry [r]: The chemistry of radioactive materials [e]
  • Requiem [r]: The first word of the Mass for the soul of a deceased person in the Latin liturgy: "Requiem æternam .." Such a Mass or related music. [e]
  • Rock (geology) [r]: Naturally occurring solid aggregate of one or more minerals and/or mineraloids. [e]
  • Sustainable development [r]: Pattern of resource use that aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but also for future generations. [e]
  • Theoretical biology [r]: The study of biological systems by theoretical means. [e]
  • U.S. Department of Energy [r]: The department responsible for advancing the national, economic, and energy security of the United States. [e]
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [r]: An agency of the federal government of the United States of America whose mission is to protect human health and safeguard the natural environment (air, water and land) of the nation [e]
  • Vitamin C [r]: Required by a few mammalian species, including humans and higher primates. It is water-soluble and is usually obtained by eating fruits and vegetables; associated with scurvy (hence its chemical name, ascorbic acid). [e]