Gene flow/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Gene flow.
See also changes related to Gene flow, or pages that link to Gene flow or to this page or whose text contains "Gene flow".

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  • Allele [r]: A specific sequence of a gene, and one of a pair in a diploid cell (one per chromosome). [e]
  • Biodiversity [r]: The study of the range of life forms in a given ecosystem. [e]
  • Biology [r]: The science of life — of complex, self-organizing, information-processing systems living in the past, present or future. [e]
  • Evolution [r]: A change over time in the proportions of individual organisms differing genetically. [e]
  • Gene [r]: The functional unit of heredity. [e]
  • Horizontal gene transfer [r]: Transfer of genetic material to a being other than one of the donor's offspring. [e]
  • Malaria [r]: A tropical infectious disease, caused by protozoa carried by mosquitoes, which is the world's worst insect vector-borne disease [e]
  • Microsatellite [r]: Polymorphic loci present in nuclear and organellar DNA that consist of repeating units of 1-6 base pairs in length. [e]
  • Natural selection [r]: The differential survival and/or reproduction of classes of entities that differ in one or more characteristics [e]
  • Plant breeding [r]: The purposeful manipulation of plant species in order to create desired genotypes and phenotypes for specific purposes, such as food production, forestry, and horticulture. [e]
  • Sewall Wright [r]: (1889–1988) A American geneticist known for his work on evolutionary theory and path analysis and one of the founders of theoretical population genetics. [e]
  • Species (biology) [r]: A fundamental unit of biological classification - a set of individual organisms that produce fertile offspring. [e]