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History of cryptography/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about History of cryptography.
See also changes related to History of cryptography, or pages that link to History of cryptography or to this page or whose text contains "History of cryptography".

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  • Ancient Greece [r]: The loose collection of Greek-speaking city-states centered on the Aegean Sea which flourished from the end of the Mycenaean age to the Roman conquest of Greece in 146 BC. [e]
  • Caesar cipher [r]: One of the first ciphers, developed by Julius Caesar [e]
  • Claude Shannon [r]: (1916-2001) A theoretical mathematician and electrical engineer, one of the foundational researchers in computer and communications design. [e]
  • Cryptography [r]: A field at the intersection of mathematics and computer science that is concerned with the security of information, typically the confidentiality, integrity and authenticity of some message. [e]
  • Data Encryption Standard [r]: A block cipher specification issued by the U.S. government in 1976, intended for sensitive but unclassified data. It is now obsolescent, succeeded by the Advanced Encryption Standard, but still used in commercial systems. [e]
  • Diffie-Hellman [r]: A technique that allows two parties to safely establish a shared secret for use as a cryptographic key, even if someone is eavesdropping on their interaction. It requires that the parties have some means of authentication to be sure they are talking to the right person. [e]
  • Digital signature [r]: A technique based on public key cryptography to allow people to "sign" documents using their private keys. [e]
  • Herodotus [r]: (c. 484 BC - c. 430 BC) Greek historian, author of the Histories (historiai, 'inquiries'), called 'The Father of History,' as he was among the first to approach the reporting of history in a logical and skeptical way. [e]
  • Julius Caesar [r]: Roman general and politician who conquered Gaul, won a civil war, and was assassinated in 44BC. [e]
  • One-time pad [r]: A cipher system in which the cryptographic key, i.e. the secret used to encrypt and decrypt messages, is a sequence of random values, each one of which is only ever used once, and only to encrypt one particular letter or word. [e]
  • Stream cipher [r]: A cipher that encrypts data by mixing it with the output of a pseudorandom number generator controlled by a key; to decrypt, run the same generator with the same key to get the same pseudorandom data, then reverse the mixing step. [e]