Magnetic field/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Magnetic field.
See also changes related to Magnetic field, or pages that link to Magnetic field or to this page or whose text contains "Magnetic field".

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  • Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Astronomy [r]: The study of objects and processes in the observable universe, e.g. stars, planets, comets or asteroids. [e]
  • Aurora Borealis [r]: Visible light stimulated by the interaction of the solar wind and the upper atmosphere, around the North Magnetic Pole. [e]
  • Biot-Savart's law [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Coulomb's law (magnetic) [r]: An inverse-square law for the force between two magnetic monopoles. [e]
  • Displacement current [r]: Time derivative of the electric displacement D; Maxwell's correction to Ampère's law. [e]
  • Electric field [r]: force acting on an electric charge—a vector field. [e]
  • Electric motor [r]: A device which converts electrical energy into mechanical energy. [e]
  • Electromagnetic wave [r]: A change, periodic in space and time, of an electric field E(r,t) and a magnetic field B(r,t); a stream of electromagnetic waves, referred to as electromagnetic radiation, can be seen as a stream of massless elementary particles, named photons. [e]
  • Galileo Probe [r]: An unmanned spacecraft sent by NASA to study the planet Jupiter and its moons. [e]
  • Gauss (unit) [r]: Gaussian unit of magnetic flux density B; symbol G; 1 G = 1 Mx/cm2 = 10 000 T. [e]
  • Gaussian units [r]: A centimeter-gram-second system of units often used in electrodynamics and special relativity. [e]
  • Geophysical MASINT [r]: A branch of measurement and signature intelligence that involves phenomena transmitted through the earth (ground, water, atmosphere) and manmade structures including emitted or reflected sounds, pressure waves, vibrations, and magnetic field or ionosphere disturbances. [e]
  • Golay Coil [r]: A saddle coil which produces a linear gradient, commonly used to create magnetic field gradients perpendicular to the main magnetic field. [e]
  • Hall effect [r]: Describes the behavior of moving charges in a magnetic field. [e]
  • Hans Christian Oersted [r]: (Rudkøbing, August 14, 1777 – Copenhagen, March 9, 1851) Danish physicist and chemist best known for his discovery of the influence of an electric current on the orientation of a compass needle. [e]
  • Hard disk [r]: The physical device in most modern computers that holds large amounts of data on a permanent basis, using magnetic media on a rapidly rotating circular platter. [e]
  • Hendrik Antoon Lorentz [r]: Dutch theoretical physicist (1853 - 1928) [e]
  • History of neuroimaging [r]: The development of techniques allowing to visualize brain structure and function. [e]
  • Internal energy [r]: Energy of a system in absence of interaction of the system with external fields [e]
  • International System of Units [r]: Metric unit system based on the metre, kilogram, second, ampere, kelvin, mole and candela. [e]
  • International Ultraviolet Explorer [r]: An astronomical satellite designed primarily to observe ultraviolet spectra. [e]
  • Magnetic constant [r]: A physical constant in the International System of Units (SI) relating mechanical force and electric current in classical vacuum with a defined value μ0 = 4π × 10−7 N/A2. [e]
  • Magnetic induction [r]: A divergence-free electromagnetic field, denoted B, determining the Lorentz force upon a moving charge, and related to the magnetic field H. [e]
  • Magnetic resonance imaging [r]: The use of magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation to visualize internal structures of non-magnetic objects non-destructively. [e]
  • Magnetism [r]: Property of attracting iron. [e]
  • Magnetometer [r]: A scientific instrument used to measure the strength and/or direction of the magnetic field in the vicinity of the instrument. [e]
  • Magnetostratigraphy [r]: Studies of the magnetic characteristics of rocks. [e]
  • Maxwell equations [r]: Mathematical equations describing the interrelationship between electric and magnetic fields; dependence of the fields on electric charge- and current- densities. [e]
  • Michael Faraday [r]: (1791 – 1867) Was an English physicist and chemist whose best known work was on the closely connected phenomena of electricity and magnetism; his discoveries lead to the electrification of industrial societies. [e]
  • NMR instrumentation [r]: Instruments required for conducting a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment. [e]
  • NMR spectroscopy [r]: The use of electromagnetic radiation, in the presence of a magnetic field, to obtain information regarding transitions between different nuclear spin states of the nuclei present in the sample of interest. [e]
  • Neuroimaging [r]: A group of techniques used to visualize structure and function of nervous systems, especially the vertebrate brain. [e]
  • Oersted (unit) [r]: Unit of magnetic-field strength |H| in the Gaussian system of units; symbol Oe; 1 Oe = 1000/4π  A⋅turn/m. [e]
  • R-hadron [r]: Hypothetical particles composed by a Supersymmetric particle and at least one quark. [e]
  • Solar system [r]: The sun and the planets orbiting it. [e]
  • Solenoid (physics) [r]: A spiral of insulating wire wound around a cylinder; when a direct current passes through the wire a magnetic field is generated, and the solenoid becomes an electromagnet. [e]
  • Stark effect [r]: The shifting and splitting of spectral lines of atoms and molecules due to the presence of an external static electric field. [e]
  • Venus (planet) [r]: The second planet from the Sun in our solar system; named after the Roman goddess of love. [e]
  • Work (Physics) [r]: Form of energy transferred to a body by a force. [e]
  • Work [r]: Form of energy transferred to a body by a force. [e]