Generative linguistics/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Generative linguistics.
See also changes related to Generative linguistics, or pages that link to Generative linguistics or to this page or whose text contains "Generative linguistics".

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  • Language acquisition [r]: The study of how language comes to users of first and second languages. [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Noam Chomsky [r]: American linguist, MIT professor and left-wing political activist. [e]
  • Psycholinguistics [r]: Study of the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to acquire, use, comprehend and produce language. [e]
  • Psychology [r]: The study of systemic properties of the brain and their relation to behaviour. [e]
  • Second language acquisition [r]: Process by which people learn a second language in addition to their native language(s), where the language to be learned is often referred to as the 'target language'. [e]
  • Syllable [r]: Unit of organisation in phonology that divides speech sounds or sign language movements into groups to which phonological rules may apply. [e]
  • Syntax (linguistics) [r]: The study of the rules, or 'patterned relations', that govern the way words combine to form phrases and phrases to form sentences. [e]
  • The Sound Pattern of English [r]: A landmark work on the rules of English phonology by Noam Chomsky and Morris Halle, which importantly rejected the phoneme as a true phonological unit; subsequently built upon by other analyses that recognised the syllable and other units of prosodic organisation. [e]
  • Verb [r]: A word in the structure of written and spoken languages that generally defines action. [e]