Population/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Population.
See also changes related to Population, or pages that link to Population or to this page or whose text contains "Population".

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  • Arcology [r]: A term used to describe a large-scale human habitat, pre-planned, and sometimes of one contiguous structure. [e]
  • Asia [r]: The largest continent in both land area (with 30% of Earth's land area) and population (with 4 billion people, or 60% of Earth's population). [e]
  • Bacteriophage [r]: A virus that infects bacteria; often called a phage. [e]
  • Biodiversity [r]: The study of the range of life forms in a given ecosystem. [e]
  • Biophysics [r]: The study of forces and energies in biological systems. [e]
  • Cuba [r]: a Communist state made up of a number of islands in the Caribbean. [e]
  • Ecological footprint [r]: The sum of all resource-using or waste-producing activities of a biological unit, if converted to units of biologically productive land. [e]
  • Edinburgh [r]: The capital of Scotland. [e]
  • Environmental geography [r]: Examines interlinkages between human and natural systems. [e]
  • Epidemiology [r]: The branch of demography that studies patterns of disease in human or animal populations. [e]
  • Ethnic group [r]: A population whose members identify with one another as distinct from others. This usually occurs through a perceived common history, and often also includes shared culture, race, religion, or language. [e]
  • Frederick Twort [r]: (1877 – 1950) - English bacteriologist who discovered that bacteriophages are viruses that attack and destroy bacteria. [e]
  • Gene flow [r]: The movement of genetic alleles from one population to another. If there is a low gene flow between two populations they may become distinct species. [e]
  • Genetics [r]: The study of the inheritance of characteristics, genes and DNA. [e]
  • Germany [r]: Federal republic in central Europe (population c. 82.4 million; capital Berlin), with the North Sea, Denmark and the Baltic Sea to the north; Poland and the Czech Republic to the east; Switzerland and Austria to the south; and France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west; founding member of the European Union. [e]
  • Habitat [r]: Place where an organism or a biological population normally lives or occurs. [e]
  • Landscape ecology [r]: Science of studying and improving the relationship between spatial pattern and ecological processes on a multitude of landscape scales and organizational levels. [e]
  • Maharashtra [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Malthusianism [r]: A theory in demography which holds that population expands faster than food supplies and famine will result unless steps are taken to reduce population growth. [e]
  • Metapopulation [r]: A group of spatially separated populations of the same species which interact at some level. [e]
  • Microsatellite [r]: Polymorphic loci present in nuclear and organellar DNA that consist of repeating units of 1-6 base pairs in length. [e]
  • OCLC [r]: A nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization, founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. [e]
  • Phage ecology [r]: Study of the interaction of bacteriophages with their environments. [e]
  • Plant breeding [r]: The purposeful manipulation of plant species in order to create desired genotypes and phenotypes for specific purposes, such as food production, forestry, and horticulture. [e]
  • Pollen [r]: Fine to coarse powder consisting of microgametophytes, which produce the male gametes of seed plants. [e]
  • Population ecology [r]: Sub-field of ecology concerning dynamics of species populations and their interactions with the environment. [e]
  • Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh [r]: The husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. [e]
  • Quiverfull [r]: A Protestant, Evangelical movement that advocates large families and no birth control. [e]
  • Sex-determination system [r]: A biological process that determines the development of sexual gender. [e]
  • Theoretical biology [r]: The study of biological systems by theoretical means. [e]
  • Transgenic plant [r]: Plants that have been genetically modified by inserting genes directly into a single plant cell, from a different species. [e]
  • Transposon [r]: Blocks of conserved DNA that can occasionally move to different positions within the chromosomes of a cell. [e]