Pineal gland/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Pineal gland.
See also changes related to Pineal gland, or pages that link to Pineal gland or to this page or whose text contains "Pineal gland".

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  • Amino acid [r]: Biochemical with an amino group, a carboxyl group, a hydrogen atom, and a side chain bonded to a central carbon. [e]
  • Anabolism [r]: Biological processes that build larger molecules from smaller ones, and increase the size of bones, organs and muscles. [e]
  • Circumventricular organs [r]: Specialised sites in the brain, positioned at sites around the margin of the ventricular system, which have an incomplete blood-brain barrier. [e]
  • Endocrinology [r]: Generically, the study of glands and the hormonal regulation of physiology; also the subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with diseases of the endocrine system [e]
  • Hypothalamus [r]: A part of the mammalian brain located below the thalamus, forming the major portion of the ventral region of the diencephalon. [e]
  • Julius Axelrod [r]: (30 May 1912 – 29 December 2004) American biochemist whose work was influential in the development of pharmaceuticals. [e]
  • Mammal [r]: A warm-blooded animal with a backbone which also has hair, and produces milk to feed its young. [e]
  • Optic tectum [r]: Roof of the mesencephalon constituting a major visual center and association area of the brain of premature vertebrates. [e]
  • René Descartes [r]: French 17th-century philosopher, mathematician and scientist, author of the Discourse on Method. [e]
  • Suprachiasmatic nucleus [r]: An agregation of neurons in the hypothalamus, located above the optic chiasm, that regulates circadian rhythms. [e]