Linguistic prescriptivism/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Linguistic prescriptivism.
See also changes related to Linguistic prescriptivism, or pages that link to Linguistic prescriptivism or to this page or whose text contains "Linguistic prescriptivism".

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  • Alphabet [r]: Writing system in which symbols - single or multiple letters, such as <a> or <ch> - represent phonemes (significant 'sounds') of a language. [e]
  • American English [r]: Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United States of America; widely used around the world. [e]
  • British English [r]: Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United Kingdom; widely used around the world, especially in current and former countries of the Commonwealth of Nations. [e]
  • Canadian English [r]: Any of the dialects of English, standard or not, that are used in Canada. [e]
  • Descriptive linguistics [r]: The work of analyzing and describing how language is spoken (or how it was spoken in the past) by a group of people in a speech community. [e]
  • English grammar [r]: The body of rules describing the properties of the English language. [e]
  • Grammar (linguistics) [r]: The structural rules that govern the composition of sentences, phrases, and words in any language; alternatively, the system of language itself, i.e. the principles common to all languages. [e]
  • Japanese language [r]: (日本語 Nihongo), Japonic language spoken mostly in Japan; Japonic family's linguistic relationship to other tongues yet to be established, though Japanese may be related to Korean; written in a combination of Chinese-derived characters (漢字 kanji) and native hiragana (ひらがな) and katakana (カタカナ) scripts; about 125,000,000 native speakers worldwide. [e]
  • Korean language [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Language planning [r]: In sociolinguistics, the name for any political attempt to change the status of a language in some way or develop new ways of using it, e.g. a government devising laws to promote a language, or scholars producing an official dictionary; the former is status planning (changing the political recognition of a language), the latter corpus planning (changing the way a language is used). [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Received Pronunciation [r]: British English accent that developed in educational institutions in the nineteenth century and is associated with the wealthy and powerful in the United Kingdom, rather than a geographic region, and which few British people actually use; 'refined' RP, even rarer, is colloquially referred to as 'posh'. [e]
  • Romansh language [r]: Romance language spoken in the Graubünden canton of eastern Switzerland; one of the official languages of the country, with about 35,000 speakers. [e]
  • Washington Post [r]: A daily newspaper in Washington DC -- first publisher of the details of the Watergate scandal. [e]
  • Writing [r]: The process of recording thoughts or speech in a visually or haptically retrievable manner. [e]