Grammar (linguistics)/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Grammar (linguistics).
See also changes related to Grammar (linguistics), or pages that link to Grammar (linguistics) or to this page or whose text contains "Grammar (linguistics)".

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  • American English [r]: Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United States of America; widely used around the world. [e]
  • Anthropological linguistics [r]: The study of language through human genetics and human development. [e]
  • British English [r]: Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United Kingdom; widely used around the world, especially in current and former countries of the Commonwealth of Nations. [e]
  • British and American English [r]: A comparison between these two language variants in terms of vocabulary, spelling and pronunciation. [e]
  • Canadian English [r]: Any of the dialects of English, standard or not, that are used in Canada. [e]
  • Chinese characters [r]: (simplified Chinese 汉字; traditional Chinese: 漢字) are symbols used to write varieties of Chinese and - in modified form - other languages; world's oldest writing system in continuous use. [e]
  • Communication [r]: The set of interactive processes that create shared meaning. [e]
  • Constructed language [r]: A language whose phonology, grammar, and/or vocabulary have been devised by an individual or group, instead of having naturally developed. [e]
  • Contact language [r]: any language which is created through contact between two or more existing languages; may occur when people who share no native language need to communicate, or when a language of one group becomes used for wider communication. [e]
  • Cranberry word [r]: or 'fossilized term', used in morphology to refer to exceptional compound words not built from productive rules, e.g. cranberry (no such thing as *cran-). [e]
  • Democrat Party (phrase) [r]: A phrase used by Republicans in the United States to refer to the opposition Democratic Party, and assumed by many Democrats to be an insulting, disparaging or derogatory term. [e]
  • English grammar [r]: The body of rules describing the properties of the English language. [e]
  • Esperanto [r]: Artificial language created by L.L. Zamenhof in the late 19th century. [e]
  • Euro [r]: The official currency of the European Monetary Union. [e]
  • Hebrew Bible [r]: consists of religious works categorized into the Torah (Law), Nevi'im (Prophets), and Ketuvim (Writings). [e]
  • History of linguistics [r]: Chronological study of the science which endeavours to describe and explain the human faculty of language. [e]
  • Human uniqueness [r]: A theoretical concept in evolutionary studies, often used in discussions about the evolution of biological traits found in humans. [e]
  • Japanese English [r]: English as used by native speakers of Japanese, either for communicating with non-Japanese speakers or commercial and entertainment purposes. Includes vocabulary and usages not found in the native English-speaking world. [e]
  • Kanji [r]: (漢字) Chinese-derived characters used to write some elements of the Japanese language. [e]
  • Korean language [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Language acquisition [r]: The study of how language comes to users of first and second languages. [e]
  • Language planning [r]: In sociolinguistics, the name for any political attempt to change the status of a language in some way or develop new ways of using it, e.g. a government devising laws to promote a language, or scholars producing an official dictionary; the former is status planning (changing the political recognition of a language), the latter corpus planning (changing the way a language is used). [e]
  • Lexis [r]: Total bank of words and phrases of a particular language, the artifact of which is known as a lexicon. [e]
  • Lingua franca [r]: Any language used for widespread communication between groups who do not share a native language or where native speakers are typically in the minority; name from 'Lingua Franca', a pidgin once used around the Mediterranean. [e]
  • Linguistic prescriptivism [r]: The laying down or prescribing of normative rules for the use of a language, or the making of recommendations for effective language usage. [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Martha Young-Scholten [r]: linguist specialising in the phonology and syntax of second language acquisition (SLA); senior lecturer at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. [e]
  • Mathematics [r]: The study of quantities, structures, their relations, and changes thereof. [e]
  • Morphology (linguistics) [r]: The study of word structure; the study of such patterns of word-formation across and within languages, and attempts to explicate formal rules reflective of the knowledge of the speakers of those languages. [e]
  • Natural language [r]: A communication system based on sequences of acoustic, visual or tactile symbols that serve as units of meaning. [e]
  • Noah Webster [r]: (1758-1843) US lexicographer who compiled the American Dictionary of the English Language and wrote a widely used Speller for use in schools in the teaching of reading and writing. [e]
  • Noam Chomsky [r]: American linguist, MIT professor and left-wing political activist. [e]
  • Noun class [r]: System which categorises and marks the nouns of a language according to their meaning, form or pronunciation; commonly known as 'grammatical gender', but many languages have several noun classes. [e]
  • Noun [r]: Linguistic item with grammatical properties such as countability, case, gender and number; has a distinct syntactic function (e.g. acting as subject or object in a clause), and used to name a person, place, thing, quality, or action. [e]
  • Pidgin Hawaiian [r]: Extinct pidgin language spoken in Hawaii, which drew most of its vocabulary from Hawaiian; spoken mainly by immigrants to Hawaii, and died out in the early twentieth century. [e]
  • Pidgin [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See Pidgin (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Plural [r]: Grammatical form that designates, relates to or composed of more than one member, set, or kind of objects specified. [e]
  • Programming language [r]: A formal language specification, and programs for translating the formal language to machine code. [e]
  • Progressive education [r]: Pedagogical movement rooted in common experience, and democratic and inclusive in outlook. [e]
  • Pronoun [r]: A pro-form that substitutes for a noun (or noun phrase) with or without a determiner, such as you and they in English. [e]
  • Psycholinguistics [r]: Study of the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to acquire, use, comprehend and produce language. [e]
  • Psychology [r]: The study of systemic properties of the brain and their relation to behaviour. [e]
  • Second language acquisition [r]: Process by which people learn a second language in addition to their native language(s), where the language to be learned is often referred to as the 'target language'. [e]
  • Semantics (linguistics) [r]: The subfield of the study of language which focuses on meaning. [e]
  • Sign language [r]: A system of language in which expressions are conveyed using body movements rather than the human voice. [e]
  • Spoken language [r]: An example of language produced using some of the articulatory organs, e.g. the mouth, vocal folds or lungs, or intended for production by these organs; alternatively, the entire act of communicating verbally - what people mean or intend, the words they use, their accent, intonation and so on. [e]
  • Stephen Krashen [r]: emeritus professor of education at the University of Southern California; his research concerns second language acquisition (SLA), bilingual education, literacy and neurolinguistics. [e]
  • Syntax (linguistics) [r]: The study of the rules, or 'patterned relations', that govern the way words combine to form phrases and phrases to form sentences. [e]
  • Verb [r]: A word in the structure of written and spoken languages that generally defines action. [e]
  • Voicing (linguistics) [r]: Either the physical production of vibration by the vocal folds as part of articulation, or the potential phonological distinction this allows, i.e. the distinct difference between units such as [b] and [p] in many languages. [e]
  • Wales [r]: A country of the United Kingdom that historically was considered a principality; population about 3,000,000. [e]
  • Welsh language [r]: A Brythonic Celtic language spoken mainly in Wales and Patagonia, Argentina. [e]
  • Written language [r]: The communication and representation of a language by means of a writing system. [e]