Life expectancy/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Life expectancy.
See also changes related to Life expectancy, or pages that link to Life expectancy or to this page or whose text contains "Life expectancy".

Parent topics

  • Life [r]: Living systems, of which biologists seek the commonalities distinguishing them from nonliving systems. [e]
  • Death [r]: State of thermodynamic equilibrium achieved after the end of life. [e]
  • Demography [r]: The study of the change in the size, density, distribution and composition of human populations over time. [e]
  • Statistics [r]: A branch of mathematics that specializes in enumeration, or counted, data and their relation to measured data. [e]

Subtopics

Other related topics

  • Aging (biology) [r]: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time. [e]
  • History [r]: Study of past human events based on evidence such as written documents. [e]
  • Japan [r]: East Asian country of about 3,000 islands; one of the world's largest economies; population about 125,000,000. [e]
  • Life extension [r]: Medical and non-medical attempts to slow down or reverse the processes of aging, to extend both the maximum and average lifespan. [e]
  • Maximum life span [r]: Measure of the maximum amount of time one or more members of a group has been observed to survive between birth and death. [e]
  • Mortality (demography) [r]: Mortality is the branch of demography that studies rates and causes of deaths for a population as a whole. [e]
  • Multiple sclerosis [r]: A chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS). [e]
  • Social history [r]: A branch of history that examines ordinary people and their strategies of coping with life, social organizations, social movements and deliberate attempts to induce social change. [e]