History of economic thought/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about History of economic thought.
See also changes related to History of economic thought, or pages that link to History of economic thought or to this page or whose text contains "History of economic thought".

The economics glossary provides definitions of terms used by economists.

The economics index provides links to topics mentioned in the economics articles.

Parent articles

Related articles - economics

  • Financial economics [r]: the economics of investment choices made by individuals and corporations, and their consequences for the economy, . [e]
  • Great Depression [r]: the severe downturn in economic activity that started in 1929 in Germany and the United States and affected many other countries. [e]
  • International economics [r]: The study of the patterns and consequences of transactions and interactions between the inhabitants of different countries, including trade, investment and migration. [e]
  • Macroeconomics [r]: The study of the behaviour of the principal economic aggregates, treating the national economy as an open system. [e]
  • Microeconomics [r]: A branch of economics that deals with transactions between suppliers and consumers, acting individually or in groups. [e]
  • Monetarism [r]: a theory that explains inflation as the inevitable consequence of an increase in the money supply. [e]
  • Welfare economics [r]: The study of the social desireability of alternative arrangements of economic activity and alternative allocations of resources. [e]

Related articles - economists

  • Milton Friedman [r]: Capitalist, libertarian economist and political theorist and winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Economics. [e]
  • Friedrich Hayek [r]: (1899–1992) Austrian School economist and political philosopher who argued for free-market capitalism. [e]
  • Alfred Marshall [r]: (26 July 1842 - 13 July 1924) English economist and one of the most influential economists of his time, with the publication of his book, Principles of Economics (1890), becoming the dominant economic textbook in England in the late 19th century. [e]
  • John Maynard Keynes [r]: 20th-century English economist who advocated using government spending and taxation to influence the economy. [e]
  • Keynesians [r]: Economists who have developed the theory originated by John Maynard Keynes that advocated the use of fiscal policy to maintain economic stability. [e]
  • Alfred Marshall [r]: (26 July 1842 - 13 July 1924) English economist and one of the most influential economists of his time, with the publication of his book, Principles of Economics (1890), becoming the dominant economic textbook in England in the late 19th century. [e]
  • (Thomas) Robert Malthus [r]: British economist (1766-1834) who warned about the dangers of population growth. [e]
  • John Stuart Mill [r]: Leading 19th-century British philosopher who made major contributions to ethics, economics, and political philosophy. [e]
  • Vilfredo Pareto [r]: (1848-1923) An Italian sociologist and economist known for his analysis of elites and his statistical studies of inequality. [e]
  • David Ricardo [r]: (18 April 1772 – 11 September 1823) English political economist, often credited with systematizing economics, and was one of the most influential of the classical economists. [e]
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