Macroeconomics/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Macroeconomics.
See also changes related to Macroeconomics, or pages that link to Macroeconomics or to this page or whose text contains "Macroeconomics".

Index

See the economics index for an index to topics referred to in the economics articles.

Parent articles

Economics

Subtopics

Keynesianism, IS-LM model, monetarism,


Related topics

Banking, Money supply, Public expenditure, Fiscal policy, Taxation

Glossary

Five other glossaries are available:


  • Automatic stabilisers [r]: the tendency in times of falling economic activity for the government spending to rise, and for tax receipts to fall - and the reverse tendency in times of rising economic activity [e]
  • Credit crunch [r]: the failure of the banking system to satisfy the economy's need for credit. [e]
  • Crowding out [r]: A fall in private sector investment resulting from an increase in government borrowing. [e]
  • Deflation [r]: a persistent sequence of reductions in the general level of prices. [e]
  • Fiscal stimulus [r]: a reduction in taxation for the purpose of raising economic output, or an increase in government spending for that purpose. [e]
  • General equilibrium [r]: A hypothetical state of a set of inter-related markets such that there is no excess supply nor excess demand in any market (see Equilibrium and disequilibrium). [e]
  • Hicks-Hansen model [r]: a model of simultaneous equilibrium in the product and money markets - shown graphically as two intersecting interest rate/spending graphs, one depicting the investment/savings (I/S) relation and the other the liquidity/money (L/M) supply relation (also known as the IS-LM model). [e]
  • Inventory cycle [r]: The contribution to the fluctuation of GDP brought about by the running-down of inventories when demand falls and their rebuilding when it recovers. Also known as the stock cycle. [e]
  • IS-LM model [r]: Model of simultaneous equilibrium in the product and money markets - shown graphically as two intersecting interest rate/spending graphs, one depicting the investment/savings (I/S) relation and the other the liquidity/money (L/M) supply relation (also known as the Hicks-Hansen model). [e]
  • Liquidity preference [r]: A desire to hold money in preference to other financial assets that is attributable to the transactions motive, the speculative motive or the precautionary motive. [e]
  • Liquidity trap [r]: a state of the economy in which an expansionary monetary policy has no effect upon output. [e]
  • Phillips curve [r]: A proposed inverse relationship between the inflation rate and the unemployment rate (that was found to lack empirical support and was replaced in the economics consensus by the expectations-augmented Phillips curve). [e]
  • Non-accelerating-inflation rate of unemployment [r]: The unemployment rate at which the expected inflation rate is the same as the actual inflation rate [e]
  • Precautionary motive [r]: A wish to hold money to meet unforeseen demands for monetary payments. [e]
  • Output gap [r]: the percentage difference between the current value of the output of an economy, and that economy's normal output trend. [e]
  • Quantitative easing [r]: An increase in the central bank's monetary liabilities as a result of its purchases of corporate or government securities. [e]
  • Shock (economics) [r]: An event that causes a change of expectations, as a result of which there are changes of economic activity that displace the economy from its previous path. [e]
  • Stockbuilding cycle [r]: Inventory cycle [e]
  • Supply shock [r]: A sudden change in the price or availability of goods or services - such as might result from an earthquake or an increase in the oil price. [e]
  • Supply-side measures [r]: measures taken with the purpose of increasing a country's economic efficiency, e.g. by removing barriers to competition or counter market failures. [e]