Calculus/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Calculus.
See also changes related to Calculus, or pages that link to Calculus or to this page or whose text contains "Calculus".

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  • Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Automobile [r]: A wheeled vehicle that carries its own engine; usually four-wheeled but is designed to stand stably without human intervention [e]
  • Bijective function [r]: A function in which each possible output value corresponds to exactly one input value. [e]
  • Blaise Pascal [r]: French mathematician, physicist, and philosopher. [e]
  • Chain rule [r]: A rule in calculus for differentiating a function of a function. [e]
  • Chemistry [r]: The science of matter, or of the electrical or electrostatical interactions of matter. [e]
  • Christiaan Huygens [r]: (14 April 1629 - 8 June 1695) an internationally renowned Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer. [e]
  • Classical mechanics [r]: The science of mechanics, which is concerned with the set of physical laws governing and mathematically describing the motions of bodies and aggregates of bodies geometrically distributed within a certain boundary under the action of a system of forces. [e]
  • Colin MacLaurin [r]: (1698–1746) Scottish mathematician who published the first systematic exposition of Newton's calculus. [e]
  • Discourse on Method [r]: Philosophical and mathematical treatise published by René Descartes in 1637, best known as the source of the famous quotation 'Je pense, donc je suis' ('I think, therefore I am'). [e]
  • Elementary function [r]: Mathematical functions built from a finite number of exponentials, logarithms, constants, one variable, and roots of equations through composition and combinations using the four elementary arithmetic operations (+ – × ÷). [e]
  • Exponential growth [r]: Increase of a quantity x with time t according to the equation x = Kat, where K and a are constants, a is greater than 1, and K is greater than 0. [e]
  • Field (mathematics) [r]: An algebraic structure with operations generalising the familiar concepts of real number arithmetic. [e]
  • Function composition [r]: The successive application of two functions. [e]
  • Gamma function [r]: A mathematical function that extends the domain of factorials to non-integers. [e]
  • Integral [r]: A central concept in calculus that generalizes the idea of a sum to cover quantities which may be continuously varying. [e]
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  • Number theory [r]: The study of integers and relations between them. [e]
  • Pascal's triangle [r]: A convenient tabular presentation for the binomial coefficients. [e]
  • Polynomial [r]: A formal expression obtained from constant numbers and one or indeterminates; the function defined by such a formula. [e]
  • Real number [r]: A limit of the Cauchy sequence of rational numbers. [e]
  • René Descartes [r]: French 17th-century philosopher, mathematician and scientist, author of the Discourse on Method. [e]
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