Talk:U.S. Constitution

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 Definition Document that states the fundamental constitutional law of the United States of America. [d] [e]

Text?

I think the actual text of the Constitution should be somewhere in CZ. In Wikipedia, it is in the Wikisource or some such thing. Any equivalent in CZ, or should this article just include the text? In my paper encyclopedia, the Constitution entry has the full text, if that's of any use in deciding... Steve Mount 14:54, 3 May 2007 (CDT)

good idea! should it be the raw or annotated version? Richard Jensen 15:19, 3 May 2007 (CDT)
If it is a separate article (U.S. Constitution (text) ?), then, I think it should probably be annotated - with links to this article and other articles specifically addressing terms and sections (like Amendment 27 and letter of marque), as well as notes about superceded sections. I have an unannotated version at [1] and an HTML version that could be the basis for an annotated version at [2]. Getting the text is not a problem - figuring out where to put it in CZ (would this be setting a precedent?) is the bigger question in my mind. Steve Mount 10:11, 4 May 2007 (CDT)

"Main Article"

It is common on Wikipedia to do as I've done on this page and have "Main Article blah blah" for something treated from a high level, like Article 1. Any opinions on whether it is better to create a "main article" to discuss Article 1 in more detail, or to discuss it in more detail on this page? steve802 22:54, 1 April 2007 (CDT)

Dates

I guess this is less a question about this article than it is about CZ in general - it is common Wikipedia practice to linkify dates and years. Is this discouraged in CZ? Also, is there a standard date format? I see some in this article were added as DD MMM YYYY, and some of my original entries are in MMM DD, YYYY format. (steve802 12:16, 2 March 2007 (CST))

Full-faith-and-credit clause (in Art. 4)

I wonder whether a different example should be found to illustrate the full-faith-and-credit clause. Currently the given example is of a legal marriage in one state which must be recognized in all the other states according to this clause. However, a number of states (and the federal government) have adopted laws refusing to recognize same-sex marriages, even if they were fully legal in Massachusetts or California. Has any court ruled on the application of this clause to those laws? (Also, I'm curious whether, say, a marriage between first cousins, which is legal in New York, is refused recognition by any of the states that forbid first-cousin marriages.) What would be a less questionable example -- are birth certificates, for instance, required to be recognized as proof of age in other states? Automobile title documents, maybe? Bruce M.Tindall 17:18, 19 August 2008 (CDT)