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Morphology (linguistics)/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Morphology (linguistics).
See also changes related to Morphology (linguistics), or pages that link to Morphology (linguistics) or to this page or whose text contains "Morphology (linguistics)".

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Bot-suggested topics

Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/Morphology (linguistics). Needs checking by a human.

  • Anthropological linguistics [r]: The study of language through human genetics and human development. [e]
  • Chinese characters [r]: (simplified Chinese 汉字; traditional Chinese: 漢字) are symbols used to write varieties of Chinese and - in modified form - other languages; world's oldest writing system in continuous use. [e]
  • Computational linguistics [r]: Defined by the Association for Computational Linguistics as:"...the scientific study of language from a computational perspective. Computational linguists are interested in providing computational models of various kinds of linguistic phenomena." [e]
  • Cranberry word [r]: or 'fossilized term', used in morphology to refer to exceptional compound words not built from productive rules, e.g. cranberry (no such thing as *cran-). [e]
  • Descriptive linguistics [r]: The work of analyzing and describing how language is spoken (or how it was spoken in the past) by a group of people in a speech community. [e]
  • Dutch language [r]: West-Germanic language spoken by roughly 20 million people in the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, and the Netherlands Antilles. [e]
  • Esperanto [r]: Artificial language created by L.L. Zamenhof in the late 19th century. [e]
  • Geomorphology [r]: The study of the landforms and geological history of an area, the processes that have shaped the landscape, and the time period over which these processes occur. [e]
  • History of linguistics [r]: Chronological study of the science which endeavours to describe and explain the human faculty of language. [e]
  • Japanese language [r]: (日本語 Nihongo), Japonic language spoken mostly in Japan; Japonic family's linguistic relationship to other tongues yet to be established, though Japanese may be related to Korean; written in a combination of Chinese-derived characters (漢字 kanji) and native hiragana (ひらがな) and katakana (カタカナ) scripts; about 125,000,000 native speakers worldwide. [e]
  • Kanji [r]: (漢字) Chinese-derived characters used to write some elements of the Japanese language. [e]
  • Korean language [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Language attrition [r]: The loss of a first or second language or a portion of that language by individuals. [e]
  • Lexicon [r]: A list of words together with additional word-specific information, i.e., a form of a dictionary. [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Mandarin language [r]: (traditional Chinese 官話, simplified 官话; pinyin Guānhuà) Sino-Tibetan language, the standard form of which constitutes 'Standard Chinese'; world's largest language by speakers, with approximately 900,000,000 users. [e]
  • Morphology (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Natural language [r]: A communication system based on sequences of acoustic, visual or tactile symbols that serve as units of meaning. [e]
  • Noun class [r]: System which categorises and marks the nouns of a language according to their meaning, form or pronunciation; commonly known as 'grammatical gender', but many languages have several noun classes. [e]
  • Politeness [r]: Culturally defined phenomenon expressed as the application of good manners or etiquette. [e]
  • Psycholinguistics [r]: Study of the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to acquire, use, comprehend and produce language. [e]
  • Theoretical linguistics [r]: Core field of linguistics, which attempts to establish the characteristics of the system of language itself by postulating models of linguistic competence common to all humans. [e]
  • Verb [r]: A word in the structure of written and spoken languages that generally defines action. [e]
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