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Exercise/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Exercise.
See also changes related to Exercise, or pages that link to Exercise or to this page or whose text contains "Exercise".

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  • Air pollution [r]: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (air pollutants) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. [e]
  • Alzheimer's disease [r]: A degenerative disease of the brain characterized by the insidious onset of dementia; manifests itself in impairment of memory, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills, followed by severe apraxias and a global loss of cognitive abilities. [e]
  • Chiropractic [r]: A complementary, alternative health-care profession that aims to heal using manual therapies on the spine and extremities. [e]
  • Digital object identifier [r]: Unique label for a computer readable object that can be found on the internet, usually used in academic journals. [e]
  • Evolution of the human diet [r]: Factors in the development of the human diet in history. [e]
  • Game [r]: A structured or semi-structured contrived activity, primarily undertaken for enjoyment or, sometimes, practice. [e]
  • Geriatrics [r]: "the branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility."(National Library of Medicine) [e]
  • Harm reduction [r]: Range of pragmatic and evidence-based public health policies designed to reduce the harmful consequences associated with drug use and other high risk activities. [e]
  • Health [r]: The default state of an organism under optimal conditions, a state characterized by the absence of disease and by the slowest natural rate of senescing. [e]
  • Holistic living [r]: The concept of simple and spiritual living with moderation in food intake, adequate exercise and positive thinking and attitude to life. [e]
  • Hypertension [r]: A multisystem disease whose hallmark is the elevation of blood pressure. [e]
  • Life extension [r]: Medical and non-medical attempts to slow down or reverse the processes of aging, to extend both the maximum and average lifespan. [e]
  • Liver function test [r]: Clinical biochemistry laboratory blood assays designed to assess liver function and diagnose diseases of the liver and bile system. [e]
  • Natural stress relief meditation [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Obesity [r]: Excessive stores of body fat. [e]
  • Oxidative stress [r]: An imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen and a biological system's ability to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or easily repair the resulting damage. [e]
  • Psychology [r]: The study of systemic properties of the brain and their relation to behaviour. [e]
  • Rejuvenation (aging) [r]: Hypothetical reversal of the aging process, aiming to repair the damage that is associated with aging or replacement of damaged tissue with new tissue. [e]
  • Socks (clothing) [r]: Knitted or woven type of hosiery for enclosing the human feet. [e]
  • Sports [r]: An activity that involves skill and physical exertion, and is governed by a generally accepted set of rules and guidelines. [e]
  • Stress (physiology) [r]: Pathological process resulting from the reaction of the body to external forces and conditions that tend to disturb the organism's homeostasis. [e]
  • Vitamin C [r]: Required by a few mammalian species, including humans and higher primates. It is water-soluble and is usually obtained by eating fruits and vegetables; associated with scurvy (hence its chemical name, ascorbic acid). [e]