Talk:Coleslaw

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 Definition Cold salad based on shredded cabbage in a mayonnaise-based dressing; shredded carrots and other vegetables often added; sweet-sour flavor [d] [e]

Is this an Americanism? We usually write it as 1 word. Peter Jackson 10:23, 28 October 2010 (UTC)

Thinking about it, I usually write it as one word. Howard C. Berkowitz 14:10, 28 October 2010 (UTC)
The Oxford Companion to Food has it as one word, as do Merriam-Webster and The Joy of Cooking. The OED has it hyphenated. Both Oxford sources, however, give other variants in their citations (including some in which "cole" is rendered as "cold"). Both also say that coleslaw came to Britain from the U.S. (where it had been introduced by the Dutch). I do not know the Cantabrigian position on this :-) The most authoritative source, however, must be Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue, whose authors spell it as one word but alternatively use the single word "slaw" as a synonym. And because of the food's close association with barbecue, you'd better put the Religion Workgroup tag on this article :-) Bruce M. Tindall 14:49, 28 October 2010 (UTC)
'And because of the food's close association with barbecue, you'd better put the Religion Workgroup tag on this article :-)'
Ha! I'll say. I am not wedded to the spellling of cole slaw. Or cole slaw. Or cold slaw. You boys go ahead and move it.
Aleta Curry 21:26, 28 October 2010 (UTC)
My 1st encounter with the word(s) was the title track from [1] - Ro Thorpe 22:04, 28 October 2010 (UTC)