Tagliatelle

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(CC) Photo: Hayford Peirce
Bolognese sauce served on homemade tagliatelle with freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

Tagliatelle is a well-known form of pasta that originated in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy, where it is particularly known as being the classic accompaniment to Bolognese sauce. A single piece is a long, flat ribbon indistiguishable from fettuccine except for its slightly greater width of about 1/4th of an inch when cut and expanding up to nearly 1/2 of an inch when cooked. When made at home, as it typically is in Italy, it is too wide to be made in a household pasta machine and must be cut by hand. The noted food-writer Marcella Hazan says that Emilia-Romagna "enjoys uncontested recognition" as the birthplace of Italy's "finest" homemade pasta,[1] although the world-renowned spaghetti is not one of the local specialties. The basic homemade dough for tagliatelle, she says, consists only of eggs and soft-wheat flour, with spinach or Swiss chard being permitted for making green pasta. The homemade version, she notes, is "not as chewy as good factory pasta" and has "the capacity of absorbing sauces deeply."[2] Although spaghetti bolognese has become a worldwide standard, in Italy Bolgonese sauce is almost always served exclusively with tagliatelle.


A typical homemade preparation of tagliatelle
The ingredients are flour, eggs, and, possibly, a little water
The ingredients are flour, eggs, and, possibly, a little water  
The ingredients in a food processor
The ingredients in a food processor  
Processing until the ingredients form a ball
Processing until the ingredients form a ball  
Ready to be put through a pasta machine
Ready to be put through a pasta machine  
Using the widest thickness
Using the widest thickness  
After the first time through the machine
After the first time through the machine  
On the left, after 20 times through the machine
On the left, after 20 times through the machine  
Beginning to use a narrower thickness
Beginning to use a narrower thickness  
Rolled through the machine to #3 or #4 thickness
Rolled through the machine to #3 or #4 thickness  
Cutting, although this is actually fettucine width
Cutting, although this is actually fettucine width  
Drying the cut pasta
Drying the cut pasta  
Boiling the pasta
Boiling the pasta  
Buttered, and ready to eat, but without sauce
Buttered, and ready to eat, but without sauce  

References

  1. Hazan, page 26
  2. Hazan, page 26

Sources

  • Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, by Marcella Hazan, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1992, ISBN 0-394-58404-X

See also