Phonology of Irish/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Phonology of Irish.
See also changes related to Phonology of Irish, or pages that link to Phonology of Irish or to this page or whose text contains "Phonology of Irish".

Parent topics

  • Irish language [r]: A Goidelic Celtic language spoken mainly on the island of Ireland and in Canada. [e]
  • Phonology [r]: In linguistics, the study of the system used to represent language, including sounds in spoken language and hand movements in sign language. [e]

Subtopics

Other related topics

  • Ireland (state) [r]: Republic (population c. 4.2 million; capital Dublin) comprising about 85% of the Atlantic island of Ireland, west of Great Britain. [e]
  • Celtic languages [r]: Branch of the Indo-European languages, sometimes believed to have once been spoken throughout Europe, now confined to the British Isles and Brittany. [e]

Linguistics

  • Orthography of Irish
  • Syllable [r]: Unit of organisation in phonology that divides speech sounds or sign language movements into groups to which phonological rules may apply. [e]
  • Stress (linguistics) [r]: Phonological and phonetic prominence of a syllable relative to other syllables, generally involving greater pitch, length or loudness. [e]
  • Prosody (linguistics) [r]: In traditional phonetics and phonology, a collective term for variables such as pitch, loudness, tempo and rhythm; nowadays, often used to mean suprasegmental, i.e. any phonological units or structure which organise segments, such as the syllable or phonological phrase. [e]

  • Phoneme [r]: Theoretical unit of language that can distinguish words or syllables, such as /b/ versus /m/; often considered the smallest unit of language, but is a transcription convention rather than a true unit in most models of phonology since the 1960s. [e]
  • Consonant [r]: Unit of language, defined in phonetics as a speech sound that involves full or partial 'closure' of the mouth, and in phonology as a segment that cannot occupy the nucleus or 'peak' of a syllable. [e]
  • Vowel [r]: Speech sound with relatively unhindered airflow; different vowels are articulated mainly through tongue movements at the palatal and velar regions of the mouth, and are usually voiced (i.e. involve vocal fold movement). [e]