Glutamate decarboxylase

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In biochemistry, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that is "pyridoxal-phosphate protein that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of L-glutamic acid to form gamma-aminobutyric acid and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is found in bacteria and in invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems. It is the rate-limiting enzyme in determining gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in normal nervous tissues. The brain enzyme also acts on L-cysteate, L-cysteine sulfinate, and L-aspartate.[1] [Gamma-aminobutyric acid]] (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Autoantibodies to GAD is associated with diabetes mellitus type 1.[2][3][4]

References

  1. Anonymous (2015), Glutamate decarboxylase (English). Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE 1; GAD1. (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 605363. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.)
  3. GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE 2; GAD2. (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 138275. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.)
  4. GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE 3; GAD3. (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 138276. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.)