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Magic (anthropology)/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Magic (anthropology).
See also changes related to Magic (anthropology), or pages that link to Magic (anthropology) or to this page or whose text contains "Magic (anthropology)".

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  • Atheism [r]: Absence of belief in any god or other supernatural beings; distinct from antitheism, or opposition to religion, and agnosticism, the position that one cannot know whether such beings exist. [e]
  • Entertainment [r]: Activity which provides a diversion or permits people to amuse themselves in their leisure time. [e]
  • Fantasy [r]: A speculative artistic genre involving the supernatural. [e]
  • Heavy metal (music) [r]: Heavy metal (often referred to simply as metal) is a popular genre of rock music that evolved in the late 1960s and early 1970s, from heavy blues and psychedelic rock. [e]
  • Hippocrates [r]: (c. 460 – 370 BCE) A physician, who revolutionized the practice of medicine by transforming it from its mythical, superstitious, magical and supernatural roots to a science based on observation and reason. [e]
  • Odin [r]: Considered the chief god in Norse paganism and the ruler of Asgard, homologous with the Anglo-Saxon Wōden and the Old High German Wotan. [e]
  • Spiritual therapies [r]: Mystical, religious or spiritual practices performed for health benefit. [e]
  • Sympathetic magic [r]: The cultural concept that a symbol, or small aspect, of a more powerful entity can, as desired by the user, invoke or compel that entity [e]
  • Theories of religion [r]: Set of theories which examine the origins of religion, classified into substantive (focusing on what it is) theories and functional or reductionist (focusing on what religions does) theories. [e]