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Literature/Catalogs

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An informational catalog, or several catalogs, about Literature.

List of literatures

One scholar[1] says there are 106 languages with significant literatures: 78 living and 28 dead. Others might disagree with some details.

Living

This means that significant literature continues to be written. Arranged by number of native speakers.

  • Chinese
  • English
  • Spanish
  • Russian
  • Hindi
  • Malay
  • Japanese
  • Bengali
  • German
  • Arabic
  • Portuguese [1]
  • French
  • Italian
  • Urdu
  • Ukrainian
  • Tamil
  • Korean
  • Telugu
  • Marathi
  • Polish
  • Turkish
  • Vietnamese
  • Punjabi
  • Gujarati
  • Thai
  • Persian
  • Kannada
  • Dutch
  • Roumanian
  • Rajastani
  • Malayalam
  • Serbo-Croat
  • Oriya
  • Burmese
  • Hungarian
  • Tagalog
  • Pushtu
  • Swahili
  • Belarussian
  • Czech
  • Nepali
  • Swedish
  • Greek
  • Ethiopian
  • Sinhalese
  • Bulgarian
  • Provençal
  • Tibetan
  • Assamese
  • Catalan
  • Sindhi
  • Malagasy
  • Danish
  • Afrikaans
  • Slovak
  • Armenian
  • Norwegian
  • Finnish
  • Cambodian
  • Kashmiri
  • Georgian
  • Lithuanian
  • Latvian
  • Galician
  • Hebrew
  • Albanian
  • Mongolian
  • Estonian
  • Yiddish
  • Basque
  • Frisian
  • Icelandic
  • Irish[2]
  • Maltese
  • Romansh
  • Slovenian
  • Sorbian
  • Khasi

Dead

This means no significant literature is being produced nowadays, though some of these languages are still spoken.

  • Babylonian
  • Breton
  • Cakchiquel
  • Cherokee
  • Chontal
  • Cornish
  • Egyptian
  • Etruscan
  • Gothic
  • Hittite
  • Ilocano
  • Javanese
  • Ladino
  • Latin
  • Madurese
  • Manchu
  • Manx
  • Nahuatl
  • Prakrit (including Pali)
  • Quechua
  • Quiché
  • Sanskrit
  • Saxon
  • Scottish
  • Sumerian
  • Syriac
  • Welsh
  • Yucatec

Reference

  1. Munro S. Edmonson, Lore: an Introduction to the Science of Folklore and Literature, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1971, pages 322f, 330f
  2. In fact this appears in both lists in the book, but comparison with the total numbers stated there shows this entry must be the correct one.