NOTICE: Citizendium is still being set up on its newer server, treat as a beta for now; please see here for more.
Citizendium - a community developing a quality comprehensive compendium of knowledge, online and free. Click here to join and contribute—free
CZ thanks our previous donors. Donate here. Treasurer's Financial Report -- Thanks to our content contributors. --

James Lovelock

From Citizendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is a stub and thus not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

James Lovelock is an independent scientist, author, researcher, environmentalist, and futurist. He is known for proposing the Gaia hypothesis, in which he postulates that the Earth functions as a kind of superorganism as planetary ecosystem.[1]

JAMES LOVELOCK, who has a Ph.D. in medicine and a D.Sc. in biophysics, worked at the National Institute for Medical Research in London. Later he collaborated on lunar and planetary research with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. His interdisciplinary research covers such broad fields as medicine, biology, geophysiology, and instrument science. He has filed over fifty patents for his inventions, and one, the electron-capture detector, first revealed the ubiquitous distribution of pesticide residues, PCBs, nitrous oxide, and the CFCs responsible for atmospheric ozone depletion. He is best known for originating the Gaia hypothesis.[2]

References

  1. Lovelock J. (2000) Gaia, Our Living Earth. In: Heather Newbold, editor. Life Stories: World-Renowned Scientists Reflect on their Lives and the Future of Life on Earth”. Chapter 1. University of California Press. ISBN 9780520218963.
  2. List of Contributors. In: Heather Newbold, editor. Life Stories: World-Renowned Scientists Reflect on their Lives and the Future of Life on Earth”. University of California Press. ISBN 9780520218963