Jamaat-i-Islami

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Jamaat-i-Islami (JI), also written Jamaat-i-Islami, is both Pakistan's oldest religious party, and an identity for a family of Islamic parties in several countries. While it is part of the legal political process, it is separate from the main Pakistani parties, the Pakistan People's Party and the Pakistan Muslim League-Nazaf (PML-N). In general, explicitly Islamist parties have not been popular in Pakistani politics. [1] The most important, but still a minority, is the Jamiat-ul-Ulama-i-Islam (JUI).

Five national organizations share a name and common ideas, but have no organizational relationship:

  • Jamaat-i-Islami Pakistan (JIP)
  • Jamaat-i-Islami Hind, an Indian organization open to coexistence with other religions, that spawned, in 1947, the JUI. JUH supported Pakistani independence..
  • Jamaat-i-Islami Bangladesh
  • Jamaat-i-Islami Sri Lanka
  • Jamaat-i-Islami Kashmir

It has never been a major force in Pakistani politics, but is becoming more powerful in the semiautonomous areas of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, Northwest Frontier Province, and Balochistan Province.[2]

The JIP was influential in the Pakistani Army of the 1980s, supporting Zia-al-Haqh. Its views on Islam were broadly consistent with that of the Muslim Brotherhood and its theoreticians, Hassan al-Banna and Sayyid Qutb.[3] More in line with government thinking was Jamait-e-Ulema-e-Islami-Pakistan (JUIP).

References

  1. Jamaat-i-Islami, Globalsecurity
  2. Larry P. Goodson (2001), Afghanistan's Endless War: State Failure, Regional Politics and the Rise of the Taliban, University of Washington Press, ISBN 0295980508, p. 161
  3. Neamatollah Nojumi (2002), The rise of the Taliban in Afghanistan: mass mobilization, civil war, and the future of the region, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 0312294026, p. 119