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Glucuronosyltransferase

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In biochemistry, glucuronosyltransferase, also called UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, is "a family of enzymes accepting a wide range of substrates, including phenols, alcohols, amines, and fatty acids. They function as drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of UDPglucuronic acid to a variety of endogenous and exogenous compounds."[1]

Mutation in the UDP-glycuronosyltransferase gene cause Gilbert Syndrome[2] and Crigler-Najjar Syndrome types I[3] and II[4].

Anti-liver kidney microsome Type 3 (LKM3) autoantibodies may be present in chonic hepatitis D,[5] autoimmune hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis.[6]

Glucuronosyltransferase is part of the phase II drug metabolism of morphine and acetaminophen.[7]

Some drug interactions may be due to glucuronosyltransferase.[8]

References

  1. Anonymous (2020), Glucuronosyltransferase (English). Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 143500. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.
  3. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 218800. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.
  4. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. MIM Number: 606785. World Wide Web URL: http://omim.org/.
  5. Obermayer-Straub P, Manns MP (1996). "Cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases as hepatocellular autoantigens.". Baillieres Clin Gastroenterol 10 (3): 501-32. PMID 8905121.
  6. Fabien N, Desbos A, Bienvenu J, Magdalou J (2004). "Autoantibodies directed against the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human autoimmune hepatitis.". Autoimmun Rev 3 (1): 1-9. DOI:10.1016/S1568-9972(03)00051-X. PMID 14871643. Research Blogging.
  7. de Wildt SN, Kearns GL, Leeder JS, van den Anker JN (1999). "Glucuronidation in humans. Pharmacogenetic and developmental aspects.". Clin Pharmacokinet 36 (6): 439-52. PMID 10427468.
  8. Kiang TK, Ensom MH, Chang TK (2005). "UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and clinical drug-drug interactions.". Pharmacol Ther 106 (1): 97-132. DOI:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2004.10.013. PMID 15781124. Research Blogging.