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Triangulum

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Triangulum is a constellation in the northern sky. It is surrounded by Perseus, Andromeda, Pisces and Aries.


Triangulum
Latin name Triangulum
Latin genitive Trianguli
International abbreviation Tri
Number of stars 227
Symbology Triangle


Remarkable objects

  • α Trianguli, magnitude 3.4. The Arabic name Metallah means 'Triangle'
  • β Trianguli, 3.0, white giant
  • γ Trianguli, 4.0, spectral class A1
  • M 33 or NGC 598 which is, besides M 33 and our own galaxy, the third largest galaxy of the Local Group

History and mythology

This constellation belongs to the classical ones of the ancient times. Due to the similarity with the letter Δ (delta), the Greeks called it Deltoton. As it also represents the first letter of the greek name of Zeus, which is Dios, this constellation shall show the beginning of the cosmic order. So it is right by Aries which is the beginning of the zodiac.[1] Aratos of Soli compared it in his Phainomena with the island of Sicily: "Near the Andromeda the island of Sicily is located, which looks like a triangle whose shortest side is graced by two near stars." [2] Due to its form, Sicily was called Trinacia and was sanctified to Demeter. Also Persephone was kidnapped here and brought into Hades.[3]

References

  1. Perrey, Werner. Sternbilder und ihre Legenden. Stuttgart: Verlag Urachhaus. ISBN 3-8251-7172-8. 
  2. Rükl, Antonin. Sternbilder von A-Z. Eggolsheim: Edition Dörfler im Nebel Verlag GmbH. ISBN 3-89555-189-9. 
  3. Geoffrey, Cornelius. Was Sternbilder erzählen / Die Mythologie der Sterner. Stuttgart: Franckh-Kosmos Verlags-GmbH & Co.. ISBN 3-440-07495-1. 


88 Official Constellations by IAU

AndromedaAntliaApusAquariusAquilaAraAriesAurigaBoötesCaelumCamelopardalisCancerCanes VenaticiCanis MajorCanis MinorCapricornusCarinaCassiopeiaCentaurusCepheusCetusChamaeleonCircinusColumbaComa BerenicesCorona AustralisCorona BorealisCorvusCraterCruxCygnusDelphinusDoradoDracoEquuleusEridanusFornaxGeminiGrusHerculesHorologiumHydraHydrusIndusLacertaLeoLeo MinorLepusLibraLupusLynxLyraMensaMicroscopiumMonocerosMuscaNormaOctansOphiuchusOrionPavoPegasusPerseusPhoenixPictorPiscesPiscis AustrinusPuppisPyxisReticulumSagittaSagittariusScorpiusSculptorScutumSerpensSextansTaurusTelescopiumTriangulumTriangulum AustraleTucanaUrsa MajorUrsa MinorVelaVirgoVolansVulpecula