Talk:Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

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 Definition The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), public law 104-191, is a statute enacted by the 104th U. S. Congress on August 21, 1996; it's primary impact is on protecting the confidentiality of health-case data. [d] [e]

Hi Howard,

Is there somewhere where all these articles are being linked to? it'd be a shame if it got orphaned... Denis Cavanagh 13:16, 30 May 2008 (CDT)

This article needs to specify the country to which it refers, in its title. It also need to be linked to articles on social policy. The workgroup Health Sciences no longer exists, so the relevant group is sociology (social policy). Martin Baldwin-Edwards 13:37, 30 May 2008 (CDT)
Thanks, Martin. I did not know health sciences had gone. With the scope I had in mind, however, there are aspects that are not strictly social policy, but, just staying in the biomedical area, biosafety. There are country-specific legal aspects, still in biomedical, and there are bioethics that might even fall under philosophy (e.g., informed consent procedures). Apropos of the latter, while it had once been assumed that the Declaration of Helsinki was a good guide, at least for Western society, it turns out that there are important cultural differences even in advanced European countries.
Good question. This primarily came from the draft regulatory section of a book I was developing, dealing, in part, with enterprise security. In the CZ case, there probably need to be central articles on regulatory impact on the security of information systems in general, but also articles on specific industries/disciplines.
To address Denis' questions, for example, at the moment, I'm working on an article on the Select Agent Program that covers the regulation of laboratories working with especially hazardous biological materials. That is US-specific, but has some quite general safety principles. While I don't have a precise title in mind, I was thinking of an article on "Biomedical Regulation and Security" that might cover:
  • HIPAA
  • Select Agent Program
  • Clinical trial requirements
  • Electronic prescribing of controlled substances.
Other topics are welcome; I am also tempted to put in some very practical experiences on developing security programs for hospitals, a matter that came up in, IIRC, a forum discussion on "family friendliness". Shall we say that typical industry web access filters do not endear the information systems people to urologists, breast surgical oncologists and reconstructive surgeons and gynecologists? They are actually less of a problem, if the filter can detect technical language, than mental health professionals that may need access to sites dealing with violence, hate, sexual topics, etc., viewed by patients.
In like manner, there are potential articles on nonmedical regulatory/security aspects for banking, for public companies, etc. Some of these are quite specific to national law, perhaps even more than social policy, at least at the level of detail I had in mind.
Suggestions are extremely welcome. Howard C. Berkowitz 13:45, 30 May 2008 (CDT)