Talk:Graphics processing unit

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 Definition An independent specialized graphics coprocessor responsible for handling the graphics output of the computer, generally to the monitor. [d] [e]

name

GPU is acronym for Graphical Processor Unit. Robert Tito | Talk 14:45, 20 February 2007 (CST)

I've heard both Graphics processing unit and Graphical processor unit used. Feel free to move it to whichever you're more comfortable with. I was just looking for a term that could easily encompass dedicated video/graphics cards and integrated graphics processors. Whatever term you're cool with works for me. --ZachPruckowski (Talk) 14:52, 20 February 2007 (CST)

List of GPUs

I am wondering whether we really need a list of GPUs. My main concern is that it contains mainly facts directly available from the manufacturers website. -- Alexander Wiebel 09:03, 28 March 2011 (UTC)

Examples are fine, but we should not try for a complete list. It would be completely unmaintainable since new models appear all the time. Sandy Harris 04:01, 30 March 2011 (UTC)
The list read like an exciting commentary by a car enthusiast about various engine models and their specs. (Chunbum Park 17:03, 30 March 2011 (UTC))

History

How much history do we need here, and does anyone know it well enough to write it?

First graphics engine I heard of was the Pixel Machine [1] from Bell Labs, using a few dozen DSPs. I think GPUs were invented in Jim Clark's PhD thesis [2] and the first widespread commercial offering was from Silicon Graphics which he founded. All that is early 80s. Was there anything earlier? To what extent do modern GPUs use principles developed there? Or have they gone beyond that? Sandy Harris 04:01, 30 March 2011 (UTC)