Talk:Gerald Ford

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 Definition (1913-2006) The 38th President of the United States (1974-77), the first not elected as either president or vice-president. [d] [e]

Red links

It is mysterious to me why RJ would remove carefully placed redlinks on major topics, given CZ:Article_Mechanics#Do_link_to_nonexistent_articles. Stephen Ewen 02:44, 7 November 2007 (CST)

lots of links are useless. Links to common words should not be linked --they distract the readers and are no help if hey actually click there (for example I deleted useless links to "paint" "adoption" "law practice "community work", "veto," "secretary of state" foreign affairs, Michigan, etc. I am following the CZ policy: Therefore, there is a general (not infallible) rule for determining whether a link is appropriate or helpful: If our target audience would find that the article linked-to illuminates the present article, then we should link to it. Richard Jensen 03:00, 7 November 2007 (CST)

Most seem quite relevant. Especially Elizabeth Ford which was removed. And how is someone from, say, Japan, or mostly white European countries going to understand desegregation busing as common? Stephen Ewen 03:41, 7 November 2007 (CST) Most are irrelevant. For example, when Ford was young his father owned a paint factory. "desegregation busing" is an odd usage that somebody at Wikipedia invented. Richard Jensen 04:01, 7 November 2007 (CST)

Neutral Point of View

"he was one of a series of failed presidents in the 1960s and 1970s."

This seems to be a bit too opinionated for an encyclopedia article. It may be more appropriate to state reasons why many feel his presidency was a failure. --Eric Clevinger 03:07, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

impeachable offense

Ro, he said something like, "an impeachable offense is what, at any time, Congress says it is." And, I'm pretty sure, had the necktie allusion in it too. But I can't track down an absolutely certain quote. I'll try the NYT search, however. Hayford Peirce 18:45, 30 October 2010 (UTC)

The Ford presidential library has the original press-release copy of the relevant speech online at http://www.ford.utexas.edu/library/speeches/700415a.htm (page 6). Bruce M. Tindall 19:40, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
Thanks! I hadn't been able to find it at the NYT! Hayford Peirce 19:41, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
Maybe it wasn't fit to print.... Bruce M. Tindall 19:42, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
Next question: Why is the Ford library's website hosted at the University of Texas when the library itself is in Ann Arbor? Bruce M. Tindall 19:43, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
Questions that only a Jerry Ford at the height of his powers could answer! (Why not the University of California at Rancho Mirage, maybe?) In any case, thanks for the link and I'll study it and see if I can bring in an apt quote for the article. Hayford Peirce 23:13, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
One interesting thing about the whole speech is that (e.g. in the paragraphs just after the famous quote) he carefully makes a distinction between the level of accusation you can bring against a judge (a Caesar's Wife threshold) and against a president (more like a fifty-saintly-nuns-of-impeccable-veracity-must-swear-they-saw-the-prez-rob-the-corner-store-and-shoot-the-clerk minimum standard). So even then, Ford was hedging against the day that his defense of a largely political judicial impeachment might be used to defend what he might see as a purely political presidential impeachment. Bruce M. Tindall 23:38, 30 October 2010 (UTC)
Hmmm. I guess that you don't get to be House minority leader without having a lot of political smarts.... Hayford Peirce 23:54, 30 October 2010 (UTC)