Reductionism/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Reductionism.
See also changes related to Reductionism, or pages that link to Reductionism or to this page or whose text contains "Reductionism".

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  • Cognitive science [r]: The scientific study either of mind or intelligence and includes parts of cognitive psychology, linguistics and computer science. [e]
  • Ecology [r]: The study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and how they are affected by the environment. [e]
  • Evolutionary psychology controversy [r]: The various criticisms of evolutionary psychology, as well as counterarguments to these criticisms. [e]
  • Global warming [r]: The increase in the average temperature of the Earth's near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. [e]
  • Logical positivism [r]: A school of philosophy that combines positivism—which states that the only authentic knowledge is scientific knowledge—with some kind of logical analysis, which is similar, but not the same as logicism. [e]
  • Music perception [r]: The study of the neural mechanisms involved in people perceiving rhythms, melodies, harmonies and other musical features. [e]
  • Quantum mechanics [r]: An important branch of physics dealing with the behavior of matter and energy at very small scales. [e]
  • Scientific method [r]: The concept of systematic inquiry based on hypotheses and their testing in light of empirical evidence. [e]
  • Theories of religion [r]: Set of theories which examine the origins of religion, classified into substantive (focusing on what it is) theories and functional or reductionist (focusing on what religions does) theories. [e]
  • Vitalism [r]: The doctrine that the functioning of a living organism does not result from physical and chemical forces alone. [e]