Messier object/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Messier object.
See also changes related to Messier object, or pages that link to Messier object or to this page or whose text contains "Messier object".

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  • Andromeda (constellation) [r]: Constellation in the northern sky, which is surrounded by Auriga, Perseus, Aries, Cetus, Eridanus, Orion and Gemini. [e]
  • Andromeda Galaxy [r]: Nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way, also known as Messier 31 [e]
  • Cancer (constellation) [r]: Constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Leo and Gemini, fourth member of the zodiac, its name is Latin for 'crab'. [e]
  • Canes Venatici [r]: Constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Ursa Major and Boötes, under the handle of the Big Dipper, its name is Latin for 'hunting dogs'. [e]
  • Canis Major [r]: A southern constellation containing Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, symbolized as a large dog. [e]
  • Capricornus [r]: A constellation in the southern sky. It is surrounded by Aquarius, Aquila, Sagittarius, Microscopium and Piscis Austrinus. [e]
  • Charles Messier [r]: (1730 - 1817) French astronomer, best known for his catalogue of unusual objects. [e]
  • Coma Berenices [r]: Constellation in the northern sky near Boötes and Leo that contains a prominent cluster of galaxies and the north pole of the Milky Way, its name is Latin for 'Berenice's Hair'. [e]
  • Crab Nebula [r]: An emission nebula located in the constellation Taurus. [e]
  • Draco (constellation) [r]: Constellation in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere near Cepheus and Ursa Major, its name is Latin for 'Dragon'. [e]
  • Galaxy [r]: Gravitationally bound system of stars typically contain ten million to one trillion stars. [e]
  • Globular cluster [r]: Spherical, globular collection of stars that orbits a galactic core as a satellite, and is generally smaller in size than a galaxy. [e]
  • Hercules (constellation) [r]: Northern constellation located between Lyra and Corona Borealis, named after the Roman mythological hero adapted from the Greek hero Heracles. [e]
  • Hydra (constellation) [r]: Stellar onstellation in the equatorial region of the southern sky near Cancer, Libra, and Centaurus, from Greek (water snake). [e]
  • Milky Way [r]: The Milky Way galaxy which contains our solar system. [e]
  • Monoceros [r]: A constellation in the southern sky. [e]
  • NGC 1039 [r]: Also known as M 34, an open cluster located in the constellation Perseus. [e]
  • NGC 1068 [r]: Also known as M 77, a galaxy located in the constellation Cetus. [e]
  • NGC 1904 [r]: A globular cluster located in the constellation Lepus. [e]
  • NGC 1912 [r]: An open cluster located in the constellation Auriga that is also known as M 38. [e]
  • NGC 1960 [r]: An open cluster in the Auriga constellation, a distance of about 4,100 light years away from Earth and is about 14 light years across. [e]
  • NGC 1976 [r]: The Orion Nebula (Great Nebula in Orion), an emission nebula in the constellation Orion also known as M 42. [e]
  • NGC 1982 [r]: An emission nebula located in the constellation Orion. [e]
  • NGC 205 [r]: A small, elliptical satellite galaxy of the Andromeda Galaxy. [e]
  • NGC 2068 [r]: An emission nebula in the constellation Orion that is also known as M 78. [e]
  • NGC 2099 [r]: Also known as M 37, an open cluster in the constellation Auriga. [e]
  • NGC 2168 [r]: Also known as M 35, an open cluster located in the constellation Gemini. [e]
  • NGC 221 [r]: NGC 221 or Messier 32, is an elliptical satellite galaxy of the Andromeda Galaxy [e]
  • NGC 2287 [r]: An open cluster in the Canis Major constellation, lying four degrees south of Sirius. [e]
  • NGC 2323 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Monoceros, is at a distance of about 3,000 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 2422 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Puppis, is at a distance of about 1,600 light-years from Earth with an estimated age of about 78 million years. [e]
  • NGC 2437 [r]: Open cluster in the constellation Puppis. [e]
  • NGC 2447 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Puppis, is at a distance of about 3,600 light years from Earth and has a spatial radius of some 10 to 12 light years. [e]
  • NGC 2548 [r]: An open cluster in the Hydra constellation, with an age estimated to amount 300 million years. [e]
  • NGC 2632 [r]: An open cluster located in the constellation Cancer. [e]
  • NGC 2682 [r]: An open cluster, or galactic cluster, in the constellation Cancer, with an age estimated at between 3.2 and 5 billion years. [e]
  • NGC 3031 [r]: Galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major [e]
  • NGC 3034 [r]: A starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major, which is five times as bright as the whole Milky Way. [e]
  • NGC 3351 [r]: A barred spiral galaxy about 33 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. [e]
  • NGC 3368 [r]: An intermediate spiral galaxy about 31 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. [e]
  • NGC 3379 [r]: A galaxy, also known as M 105, in the constellation Leo. [e]
  • NGC 3556 [r]: An edge-on spiral galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. [e]
  • NGC 3587 [r]: A large planetary nebula in Ursa Major which has two large, circular darker areas in an otherwise opaque spherical shell. [e]
  • NGC 3623 [r]: An intermediate spiral galaxy about 22 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. [e]
  • NGC 3627 [r]: An intermediate spiral galaxy about 36 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. [e]
  • NGC 3992 [r]: Galaxy in the constellation Ursa Maior. [e]
  • NGC 4192 [r]: An intermediate spiral galaxy about 60 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 4254 [r]: An unbarred spiral galaxy approximately 60 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 4258 [r]: A galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. [e]
  • NGC 4303 [r]: A spiral galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. [e]
  • NGC 4321 [r]: A spiral galaxy about 52.5 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 4374 [r]: A lenticular galaxy in the constellation Virgo, situated in the heavily populated inner core of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. [e]
  • NGC 4382 [r]: A lenticular galaxy (type S0) in the Coma Berenices constellation, 60 million light years away, and estimated to be 125,000 light years across. [e]
  • NGC 4406 [r]: A lenticular galaxy in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4472 [r]: An elliptical, lenticular galaxy about 49 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4486 [r]: A giant elliptical galaxy, which is the largest and brightest galaxy within the northern Virgo Cluster, located about 55 million light years away. [e]
  • NGC 4501 [r]: A spiral galaxy about 47 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 4548 [r]: A barred spiral galaxy about 63 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 4552 [r]: An elliptical galaxy in the constellation Virgo, and a member of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. [e]
  • NGC 4569 [r]: A spiral galaxy about 60 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4579 [r]: A galaxy located in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4590 [r]: A globular cluster in the Hydra constellation, which is at a distance of about 33,000 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 4594 [r]: An unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo, which has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. [e]
  • NGC 4621 [r]: An elliptical galaxy in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4649 [r]: A galaxy located in the constellation Virgo. [e]
  • NGC 4736 [r]: A spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. [e]
  • NGC 4826 [r]: A galaxy located in the constellation Coma Berenices. [e]
  • NGC 5024 [r]: A globular cluster in the Coma Berenices constellation, and about 58,000 light-years from the Solar system. [e]
  • NGC 5055 [r]: An unbarred spiral galaxy in the Canes Venatici constellation, consisting of a central disc surrounded by many short spiral arm segments. [e]
  • NGC 5236 [r]: An intermediate spiral galaxy approximately 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra. [e]
  • NGC 5457 [r]: A face-on spiral galaxy about 27 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. [e]
  • NGC 581 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Cassiopeia, which is at a distance of about 8,000 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 598 [r]: A spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. [e]
  • NGC 6093 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Scorpius. [e]
  • NGC 6171 [r]: A very loose globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus, which is close to the galactic plane at a distance of about 20,900 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6205 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules. [e]
  • NGC 6218 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus, about 16,000 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6254 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. [e]
  • NGC 6266 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus, which is at a distance of about 22,500 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6273 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus, and the most oblate of the known globular clusters. [e]
  • NGC 628 [r]: A face-on spiral galaxy in the constellation Pisces, containing two clearly-defined spiral arms and used as an archetypal example of a Grand Design Spiral Galaxy. [e]
  • NGC 6333 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus, with a distance from Earth of 25,800 light-years. [e]
  • NGC 6341 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Hercules, with a distance of about 26,000 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6402 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus, at a distance of about 30,000 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6405 [r]: An open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius, with a vague resemblance of its shape to a butterfly. [e]
  • NGC 6475 [r]: An open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius. [e]
  • NGC 6494 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Sagittarius, with a distance of about 2,150 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 650 [r]: A planetary nebula in the constellation Perseus. [e]
  • NGC 6514 [r]: Cluster associated with nebula located in the constellation Sagittarius, also known as M 20 or Trifid Nebula. [e]
  • NGC 6523 [r]: A patchy, luminous gaseous nebula in the southern constellation Sagittarius, that appears to be surrounded by a much larger region of cold, neutral hydrogen. [e]
  • NGC 6531 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6611 [r]: A young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens. [e]
  • NGC 6613 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6618 [r]: A bright H II region in the constellation Sagittarius that is both a bright far infrared source and a double radio source. [e]
  • NGC 6626 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Sagittarius, with a distance of about 18,000 to 19,000 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6637 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Sagittarius, with a distance of about 29,700 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6656 [r]: An elliptical globular cluster in the constellation Sagittarius near the Galactic bulge region. [e]
  • NGC 6681 [r]: A globular cluster located in the constellation Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6694 [r]: An open cluster located in the constellation Scutum. [e]
  • NGC 6705 [r]: An open cluster in the constellation Scutum. [e]
  • NGC 6715 [r]: A globular cluster located in the constellation Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6720 [r]: A planetary nebula in the northern constellation Lyra. [e]
  • NGC 6779 [r]: A globular cluster, also known as Messier 56 or M 56, located in the constellation Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6809 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Sagittarius, with a distance of about 17,300 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6838 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Sagitta, with a distance of about 12,000 light years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6853 [r]: A planetary nebula of large apparent diameter and low surface brightness in the constellation Vulpecula, about 1,360 light years away. [e]
  • NGC 6864 [r]: A globular cluster located in the constellation Sagittarius. [e]
  • NGC 6913 [r]: An open cluster in the Cygnus constellation. [e]
  • NGC 6981 [r]: A globular cluster in the Aquarius constellation, located at about 53,000 light-years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 6994 [r]: An asterism of four stars in the constellation of Aquarius. [e]
  • NGC 7078 [r]: A globular cluster in the constellation Pegasus, with a distance of about 33,600 light-years from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 7092 [r]: An open cluster in the Cygnus constellation, with a distance of about 800 light years away from Earth. [e]
  • NGC 7099 [r]: A globular cluster located in the constellation Capricornus, also known as M 30. [e]
  • NGC 7654 [r]: An open cluster in the Cassiopeia constellation. [e]
  • Ophiuchus [r]: A constellation in the southern sky. [e]
  • Puppis [r]: Constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Canis Major and Pyxis, its name is Latin for the 'poop deck' on a ship. [e]
  • Sagitta [r]: Constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Aquila and Vulpecula, its name is Latin for 'arrow'. [e]
  • Serpens [r]: Constellation in the equatorial region of the northern sky, made up of two parts, Serpens Cauda, the tail, and Serpens Caput, the head, both near Hercules and Ophiuchus, its name is Latin for 'serpent'. [e]
  • Vulpecula [r]: Constellation in the celestial Northern Hemisphere near Cygnus and Sagitta, its name is Latin for 'little fox'. [e]
  • Whirlpool Galaxy [r]: Galaxy located in the constellation Canes Venatici. [e]