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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Light.
See also changes related to Light, or pages that link to Light or to this page or whose text contains "Light".

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  • Acetaldehyde [r]: The second smallest aldehyde, second only to formaldehyde. [e]
  • Air preheater [r]: A general term to describe any device designed to preheat the combustion air used in a fuel-burning furnace for the purpose of increasing the thermal efficiency of the furnace. [e]
  • Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Armand Fizeau [r]: (23 September 1819 - 18 September 1896) French physicist, who was the first to measure the speed of light without any recourse to astronomical observations, and using photography took the first clear pictures of the Sun. [e]
  • Atmosphere [r]: The layers of gas surrounding stars and planets. [e]
  • Bifrenaria [r]: A genus of orchids formed by circa twenty species of South America, some widely cultivated because of their large and colored flowers; divided in two distinct groups, one with large flowers and short inflorescences and the other with small flowers and long inflorescences. [e]
  • Black (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Cadmium [r]: A chemical element with the symbol Cd and atomic number 48. [e]
  • Chemistry [r]: The science of matter, or of the electrical or electrostatical interactions of matter. [e]
  • Christiaan Huygens [r]: (14 April 1629 - 8 June 1695) an internationally renowned Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer. [e]
  • Coal mining [r]: A term that encompasses the various methods used to extract the carbon-containing rock called coal from the ground. [e]
  • Coal [r]: A carbon-containing rock formed by the effect of bacteria, heat and pressure on the debris from the decay of ferns, vines, trees and other plants which flourished in swamps millions of years ago. [e]
  • Color [r]: The property of reflecting light of a particular wavelength distinguished by the qualities of hue (as red, brown, yellow, etc.), lightness (for pigmented surfaces) or brightness (for light itself), and saturation (the degree of intensity of a hue). [e]
  • Combustion [r]: A sequence of exothermic chemical reactions between a fuel and an oxidant accompanied by the production of heat or both heat and light in the form of either a glow or flames. [e]
  • Cosmic inflation [r]: Theorized exponential expansion of the universe at the end of the grand unification epoch, 10−36 seconds after the Big Bang, driven by a negative-pressure vacuum energy density. [e]
  • Count Rumford [r]: (1753–1814) An American born soldier, statesman, scientist, inventor and social reformer. [e]
  • Double-slit experiment [r]: Demonstration of the wave properties of light, first performed by Thomas Young to demonstrate Christiaan Huygen’s Principle. [e]
  • Ecology [r]: The study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and how they are affected by the environment. [e]
  • Edward William Barton-Wright [r]: One of the first Europeans to teach Japanese martial arts and pioneer hybrid martial arts. [e]
  • Electro-optical MASINT [r]: A subdiscipline of measurement and signature intelligence (MASINT), which has similarities to but complements imagery intelligence (IMINT); it does not form images, but validates them and produces information on phenomena that emit, absorb, or reflect electromagnetic energy in the infrared, visible light, or ultraviolet spectra, where the value is knowledge of the type of energy detected [e]
  • Electromagnetic spectrum [r]: The range of electromagnetic waves covering all frequencies and wavelengths. [e]
  • Energy (science) [r]: A measurable physical quantity of a system which can be expressed in joules (the metric unit for a quantity of energy) or other measurement units such as ergs, calories, watt-hours or Btu. [e]
  • Explosives [r]: Explosive agent; a compound or mixture susceptible of a rapid chemical reaction, as gunpowder, or nitroglycerin. [e]
  • Flue gas [r]: The gas that exits to the atmosphere via a flue which may be a pipe, channel or chimney for conveying combustion product gases from a fireplace, oven, furnace, boiler or steam generator. [e]
  • Glasses [r]: Devices worn in front of the eyes to protect them or to correct or enhance vision. [e]
  • Heat of combustion [r]: The energy released as heat when a substance undergoes complete combustion with oxygen. [e]
  • Hendrik Antoon Lorentz [r]: Dutch theoretical physicist (1853 - 1928) [e]
  • Hertz [r]: The international (SI) unit of frequency, with units of inverse seconds, commonly called cycles per seocond. [e]
  • Inverse-square law [r]: A physical law stating that some physical quantity or strength is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of that physical quantity. [e]
  • Iron [r]: An important transition metal and chemical element with the symbol Fe (Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. [e]
  • James Clerk Maxwell [r]: (1831 – 1879) Scottish physicist best known for his formulation of electromagnetic theory and the statistical theory of gases. [e]
  • Jean-Bertrand-Léon Foucault [r]: (1819-1868), was a physicist who calculated the speed of light to within 1% of modern estimations. [e]
  • Johann Christian Andreas Doppler [r]: (29 November 1803 - 17 March 1853) Austrian mathematician and physicist, who in 1842 discovered the 'Doppler effect', where the observed frequency of a wave depends on the velocity of the source relative to the observer. [e]
  • Light day [r]: Distance that light travels in a vacuum in one day; 1 light day = 25,902,068,371,200 m = 2.5902067 * 1013m. [e]
  • Light hour [r]: Distance that the light travels in vacuum in one hour, 1.0792528 * 1012m [e]
  • Light minute [r]: Distance that light travels in vacuum in one minute; 17,987,547,480 m = 1.7987547 * 1010m. [e]
  • Light month [r]: The distance, meters, that light travels in one month. [e]
  • Light second [r]: Distance that light travels in vacuum in one second; 2.99792458 * 108m. [e]
  • Light week [r]: Distance that light travels in a vacuum in one week; 1 light week = 1.81314469 * 1011km. [e]
  • Light year [r]: Distance that light travels in vacuum in one year; 9,460,730,472,580.800 km = 9.4607304 * 1012 km. [e]
  • Lightning [r]: An atmospheric discharge of electricity accompanied by thunder, which typically occurs during thunderstorms, and sometimes during volcanic eruptions or dust storms. [e]
  • Magnetometer [r]: A scientific instrument used to measure the strength and/or direction of the magnetic field in the vicinity of the instrument. [e]
  • Matter [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See Matter (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Methane [r]: A chemical compound and alkane with the molecular formula CH4, and the principal component of natural gas. [e]
  • Michael Faraday [r]: (1791 – 1867) Was an English physicist and chemist whose best known work was on the closely connected phenomena of electricity and magnetism; his discoveries lead to the electrification of industrial societies. [e]
  • Microorganism [r]: A 'germ', an organism that is too small to be seen individually with the naked eye. [e]
  • Microscope [r]: An instrument that magnifies the image of small objects such that they become observable by humans. [e]
  • Milky Way [r]: The Milky Way galaxy which contains our solar system. [e]
  • Miltonia [r]: An orchid genus formed by nine showy epiphyte species and seven natural hybrids of Brazil, one species reaching Argentina and Paraguay. [e]
  • Molecule [r]: An aggregate of two or more atoms in a definite arrangement held together by chemical bonds. [e]
  • Month [r]: Unit of time originally corresponding approximately to one cycle of the moon's phases, or about 30 days or 4 weeks. [e]
  • Moon [r]: The only natural satellite of our planet, Earth. [e]
  • Noether's theorem [r]: A theorem which states that any differentiable symmetry of the action of a physical system has a corresponding conservation law. [e]
  • Orchid [r]: Any plant classified under Orchidaceae, one of the largest plant families and the largest among Monocotyledons. [e]
  • Oxygen [r]: A chemical element with the symbol O and atomic number 8. [e]
  • Photon [r]: elementary particle with zero rest mass and unit spin associated with the electromagnetic field. [e]
  • Phymatochilum [r]: Is an orchid genus formed by only one species, Phymatochilum brasiliense, inhabitant of Serra do Mar mountains in Brazilian southeast and northeast, which vegetatively resembles Oncidium species, however, is more closely related to the genus Miltonia. [e]
  • Physics [r]: The study of forces and energies in space and time. [e]
  • Plant (organism) [r]: A eukaryotic organism, grouped into the kingdom Plantae, that typically synthesizes nutrients through photosynthesis and possesses the inability to voluntarily move. [e]
  • Radiation [r]: Transmission of energy through space. [e]
  • Second [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See Second (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Sighthound [r]: A classification of dog breeds with exceptional visual ability, sensitive to sight and motion and originally more reliant on these senses for hunting than on smell or sound. [e]
  • Solar system [r]: The sun and the planets orbiting it. [e]
  • Special relativity [r]: Theory of the effects of motion on observations of things such as length, time, mass and energy. The theory is based on the postulates that all laws of physics are the same in all inertial reference systems, and that the vacuum speed of light is a universal constant, independent of the speed of the source. [e]
  • Speed of light [r]: A physical constant c describing the speed of electromagnetic radiation in vacuum. In the International System of Units the metre is the distance light travels in classical vacuum in 1/c seconds, using the defined value c = c0299  792  458 m/s (exact). [e]
  • Stellar classification (astrophysics) [r]: The categorization of stars by various properties. [e]
  • Temperature [r]: A fundamental quantity in physics - describes how warm or cold a system is. [e]
  • Wave-particle duality [r]: The concept that all matter and energy exhibits both wave-like and particle-like properties. [e]
  • Wood [r]: Organic material produced as a secondary xylem in the stems of trees (and other woody plants). [e]
  • X-ray [r]: An ionizing type of electromagnetic radiation whose absorption or diffraction often used for structural investigations of matter. [e]
  • Year [r]: A unit of time measurement that corresponds to one revolution of the earth around the sun, approximately 365¼ days. [e]