International law enforcement

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International law enforcement operates by multilateral and bilateral agreements. The term connotes actions directed at individuals and groups, rather than actions in which nations violate international law.; the violations of concern to international law enforcement are frequently violations of national law, but agreed to be subject to judicial extradition. In some cases, by working through an international organization such as Interpol, even countries with no diplomatic relations may cooperate in the investigation of transnational crime, and in the apprehension and trial of individuals accused of crimes.

Categories of internationally recognized crime

Certain types of crime, such as piracy and slavery, have long fallen under the theory of Hostis humani generis, or crimes against humanity against which any nation can act.

Interpol identifies categories of special interest as including: