Hajime Sorayama

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Hajime Sorayama (1947-) is a Japanese artist working in a hyper-realistic style. With brush, pencil, acrylic paint and an airbrushed finish, he has created a body of instantly identifiable work, whether they be robotic or erotic.

Sorayama entered Japan's Chuo Art School in 1967. Upon graduation in 1969, he found employment as a comprehensive illustrator at the Tokyo-based advertising firm Asahi Tsushin-sha. In 1972, he began working independently as a free-lance illustrator. His path was clear by 1978, when he began publicly showing the female figures which he had been developing over the years. This was the same year he also began to draw robotic figures. His metallic organic surfer appeared in Japanese magazines of the late 1970s and were soon followed by his female organic robotic forms that became popular in the mid 1980s so much so as the term "Sexy Robots" became of use to describe Sorayama art. Soon these forms would be combined to create "Gynoids," or Sexy Robots[1] — female cyborgs which combine sensuously human body parts with inorganic, machine-like connections, protrusions and coverings. In the 1980s a number of books of his work was published in Japan, among them Sexy Robot, Pin-Up and Venus Odyssey. In 1988, the first non-Japanese book of his work was published by Taco in Berlin; and about the same time, maybe earlier, by the book "Hajime Sorayama" by the famous German book publisher, Taschen.

Sorayama was first invited to the USA by Mark Dippe of Industrial Light and Magic studios as special effects graphics artists and moviemakers wanted him to speak about his creations of organic robotic female forms. When Sorayama had his first U.S. one-person show at a Los Angeles gallery, he was already an international star. Miharu Yamamoto of Artspace Company Y and Mayumi Kubota are the exclusive agents of Hajime Sorayama.

The late 1990s to present day 2010 are a busy period for Sorayama. In addition to books, limited edition lithographic prints and giclees being published, Sorayama's futuristic and Shunga-style work was serialized monthly in Bob Guccione's Penthouse magazine and graced the pages of Playboy and other magazines. He consulted as a conceptual artist for the films, Brain Dead (movie) (1992), Time Cop (1994), Spawn (movie) (1997), Night Watch (movie) (1997), and the HBO TV series, Perversions of Science (1997). In 1995, he designed a mechanical warrior for the science-fiction B-movie, Space Trucker. His renderings of the female form appear on Aerosmith's album "Just Press Play" and has been engaged to do art for female T3 Terminator as well as the Star Trek series borgified female forms. Southpark, the animated show, has used Sorayama art in one of their episodes.

In the late 1990's, Sorayama was approached by the Sony Corporation to design an organic robotic form. It became the famous "AIBO" dog, the first [artificial intelligence] pet[1], which received Japan's highest design award and was acquired by the Museum of Modern Art.[2] and the Smithsonian Institution for their permanent collections. All this occurring at the turn of the century as Sorayama's art grew in popularity.

In 2005, Playboy Sexcetra made a TV special about Sorayama including an interview with his longtime agent Ms. Yamamoto. During 2002 to 2008 Sorayama had many well attended art shows at different venues; One Man Show at Gallery GGG, Tokyo and Osaka/Japan,Group Exhibitions at Ginza Recruit Gallery in Tokyo, a USA venue one was at the international Opera Gallery NYC location and the other at WEAM in South Beach, Florida. In 2009, Sorayama was one of 25 Japanese artists to be commissed by Nike to create a tribute to the company's White Dunk. An interview with Sorayama can be seen at www.whitedunk.com In 2010 to 2012, Sorayama worked on releasing his new book Masterworks, 3d Sexy Robotic models with Yamato Toys USA and some to be announced new movie and music industry projects.

Sorayama's most extensive publishing project, a new book entitled Sorayama Master Works, was released in late spring 2010.

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