Arthur Miller

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Arthur Miller (1915-2005)[1], was an American author of plays and films. He was a prominent figure in American theatre, writing dramas that include awards-winning plays such as All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, and The Crucible. Miller was often in the public eye including giving testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee, receiving the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and for being married to Marilyn Monroe.

Miller's career as a writer spanned over seven decades, and at the time of his death, Miller was considered to be one of the greatest dramatists of the twentieth century. After his death, many respected actors, directors, and producers paid tribute to Miller,[2] some calling him the last great practitioner of the American stage,[3] and Broadway theaters darkened their lights in a show of respect.[4] Miller's alma mater, the University of Michigan opened the Arthur Miller Theatre in March, 2007. Per his express wish, it is the only theater in the world that bears Miller's name.[5]

Miller's papers are housed at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin.

References

  1. Death of a playwright: legend Arthur Miller dies aged 89, a February 11, 2005 obituary from The Guardian
  2. Tributes to Arthur Miller. BBC.co.uk (2005-02-12). Retrieved on 2010-2-2.
  3. Legacy of Arthur Miller. BBC.co.uk (2005-02-11). Retrieved on 2010-2-2.
  4. Broadway lights go out for Arthur Miller. BBC.co.uk (2005-02-12). Retrieved on 2010-2-2.
  5. U-M celebrates naming of Arthur Miller Theatre. University of Michigan. Retrieved on 2010-2-2.