Ancient Greece/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Ancient Greece.
See also changes related to Ancient Greece, or pages that link to Ancient Greece or to this page or whose text contains "Ancient Greece".

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  • Abolla [r]: A garment worn by Ancient Greeks and Romans. [e]
  • Academy [r]: The name traditionally associated with Plato's philosophy school just north of Athens; thought by some sources to have been the name of a grove of trees. In modern usage the term often refers to higher education as an ideal type. [e]
  • Adoption [r]: In childcare, a legal act in which existing parental rights are terminated and are instead granted to adoptive parents. [e]
  • Agora [r]: In ancient Greek cities, a place for both market activity and a forum. Modern usage tends to stress only the former. [e]
  • Alexander the Great [r]: King of Macedon who conquered the Persian Empire in the late 4th century BCE. [e]
  • Alphabet [r]: Writing system in which symbols - single or multiple letters, such as <a> or <ch> - represent phonemes (significant 'sounds') of a language. [e]
  • Atheism [r]: Absence of belief in any god or other supernatural beings; distinct from antitheism, or opposition to religion, and agnosticism, the position that one cannot know whether such beings exist. [e]
  • Bread [r]: A kind of food made from heated dough. [e]
  • Citizen [r]: A legally recognized member of a political or civil community. [e]
  • Classics [r]: A branch of the Humanities dealing with language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of the ancient Mediterranean world. [e]
  • Common fig [r]: is the plant Ficus carica and the fruit it produces, originally native to southwest Asia, from Turkey to northern India, which is cultivated for food, is also known for being one of the earliest fruits to be cultivated by prehistoric peoples; it was a staple food in ancient Greece, and still is around the Mediterranean. [e]
  • Death [r]: State of thermodynamic equilibrium achieved after the end of life. [e]
  • Diophantine equation [r]: Equation in which the unknowns are required to be integers. [e]
  • Discovery of penicillin [r]: Chronology of research into the use of antibiotics, derived from the mould Penicillium notatum. [e]
  • Epicurus [r]: Ancient Greek philosopher who founded epicureanism. [e]
  • Geography [r]: Study of the surface of the Earth and the activities of humanity upon it. [e]
  • Greece [r]: The southernmost Balkan nation, the Hellenic Republic (Greece; population c. 11 million; capital Athens) is bordered by Albania, the (former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia, Bulgaria and Turkey, and with a coastline on the Ionian, Aegean and Mediterranean seas. [e]
  • Greek alphabet [r]: Set of twenty-four letters that has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC. [e]
  • Greek mythology [r]: Body of myths and legends belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their Gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. [e]
  • Hans-Georg Gadamer [r]: (1900–2002) Leading philosopher in the field of hermeneutics, the art of interpretation. [e]
  • Herophilus [r]: (335 B.C. - 280 B.C.) Alexandrian physician, often called the father of anatomy. [e]
  • Hippocrates [r]: (c. 460 – 370 BCE) A physician, who revolutionized the practice of medicine by transforming it from its mythical, superstitious, magical and supernatural roots to a science based on observation and reason. [e]
  • History of cryptography [r]: The development, since antiquity, of means of concealing communications from other than the intended recipient [e]
  • History of geography [r]: Chronology of the development and history of geography. [e]
  • History of linguistics [r]: Chronological study of the science which endeavours to describe and explain the human faculty of language. [e]
  • History of scientific method [r]: Development and elaboration of rules for scientific reasoning and investigation. [e]
  • Infanticide [r]: Intentionally causing the death of an infant [e]
  • Law [r]: Body of rules of conduct of binding legal force and effect, prescribed, recognized, and enforced by a controlling authority. [e]
  • Logic [r]: The study of the standards and practices of correct argumentation. [e]
  • Mars (planet) [r]: The fourth planet from the Sun in our solar system; named after the Roman god of war; also known as the "Red Planet". [e]
  • Mediterranean Sea [r]: The body of water separating Europe from Africa. [e]
  • Natural number [r]: An element of 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., often also including 0. [e]
  • Olympias [r]: (c. 375 – 316 BC) Greek princess of Epirus, daughter of king Neoptolemus I of Epirus, the fourth wife of the king of Macedonia, Philip II, and mother of Alexander the Great. [e]
  • Pantheism [r]: A religious and philosophical doctrine that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. [e]
  • Panthera leo (Lion) [r]: Large gregarious predatory carnivorous feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male, one of four big cats in the genus Panthera, and a member of the family Felidae. [e]
  • Plato [r]: (circa 427-347 BCE) Ancient Greek philosopher, whose dialogues, supposedly recording conversations with Socrates, contain many of the debates central to Western philosophy. [e]
  • Political philosophy [r]: Branch of philosophy that deals with fundamental questions about politics. [e]
  • Portuguese language [r]: An Iberian Romance language, of the Indo-European family. [e]
  • René Descartes [r]: French 17th-century philosopher, mathematician and scientist, author of the Discourse on Method. [e]
  • Republicanism [r]: The political ideology of a nation as a republic, with an emphasis on liberty, rule by the people, and the civic virtue practiced by citizens. [e]
  • Sephardi Jews [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Socrates [r]: (ca. 470–399 BCE) Greek philosopher who is credited with laying the foundations of western philosophy; sentenced to death in Athens for heresy. [e]
  • State [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See State (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Theatre (building) [r]: A structure in which theatrical or dramatic works, often simply called "plays," are performed. [e]
  • Theatre [r]: Those areas of the arts involving performance, especially of the spoken word. [e]
  • Trigonometric function [r]: Function of an angle expressed as the ratio of two of the sides of a right triangle that contains that angle; the sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant. [e]
  • Venus (planet) [r]: The second planet from the Sun in our solar system; named after the Roman goddess of love. [e]