Difference between revisions of "Sharia"

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(New page: The '''Sharia''', also transliterated from the Arabic '''xxxxx''' as '''Shar'ia'', is the system of jurisprudence and codes from proper conduct drawn from sources including the Qu'ran,...)
 
 
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The '''Sharia''', also transliterated from the Arabic '''xxxxx''' as '''Shar'ia'', is the system of jurisprudence and codes from proper conduct drawn from sources including the [[Qu'ran]], traditional (primarily Arab) traditions, the [[Sunna]], and the [[Hadith]]s. It draws Arab Bedouin law, commercial law from Mecca, agrarian law from Madina, law from the conquered countries, Roman law and Jewish law.
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The term '''sharia''', refers to a code of conduct that is intended to regulate all human actions by  categorising  each as obligatory (''fard''), recommended ('' mustahabb''), permitted (''halal''), disliked (makruh), or forbidden (''haram''). Sharia codes are mainly interpretations of the [[Qur'an]], the sayings and conduct of the prophet Muhammad, and the rulings of respected  Islamic scholars. Interpretation of those sources is provided separately in each community by the [[Arab Spring/Catalogs#Grand Mufti|Grand Mufti]] of that community. There is no forum in which differences of interpretation can be resolved and no central authority to which they can be referred. As a result there are activities that are halal in some Muslim communities. An example is  music, the enjoyment of which is forbidden by Mufti al-Kawthar<ref>[http://qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=1786 Mufti  Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthar: ''Music and Singing: A Detailed Fatwa'']</ref>, but permitted by Mufti Gomaa
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<ref>[http://www.ali-gomaa.com/?page=fatwas&fatwa_details=86 Mufti Ali Gomaa: ''What is the ruling concerning Music?'']</ref>.
  
Sharia is not strictly Islamic law, which depends strictly on the [[Qu'ran]]. Only a small part is irrefutably based upon the core Islamic text, the Koran. Correct designations would be "Muslim Law", "Islam-inspired", "Islam-derived," or even "the law system of Muslims." Sharia is always referred to as "based upon the Koran", hence it is the "will of God."
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Many Muslim countries have  dual systems in which the government is secular but Muslims can choose to bring familial and financial disputes to sharia courts. The exact jurisdiction of these courts varies from country to country, but usually includes marriage, divorce, inheritance, and guardianship.
  
[[Islamist]] refers to government run by the rules of Sharia, but, with the caveat that Islamists do not separate between religion and state, Islamist principles are as much political as theologicsl.
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==Notes==
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{{reflist}}

Latest revision as of 23:09, 31 October 2013

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The term sharia, refers to a code of conduct that is intended to regulate all human actions by categorising each as obligatory (fard), recommended ( mustahabb), permitted (halal), disliked (makruh), or forbidden (haram). Sharia codes are mainly interpretations of the Qur'an, the sayings and conduct of the prophet Muhammad, and the rulings of respected Islamic scholars. Interpretation of those sources is provided separately in each community by the Grand Mufti of that community. There is no forum in which differences of interpretation can be resolved and no central authority to which they can be referred. As a result there are activities that are halal in some Muslim communities. An example is music, the enjoyment of which is forbidden by Mufti al-Kawthar[1], but permitted by Mufti Gomaa [2].

Many Muslim countries have dual systems in which the government is secular but Muslims can choose to bring familial and financial disputes to sharia courts. The exact jurisdiction of these courts varies from country to country, but usually includes marriage, divorce, inheritance, and guardianship.

Notes