Placebo effect/Related Articles

From Citizendium
< Placebo effect
Revision as of 00:34, 12 January 2010 by Housekeeping Bot (Talk | contribs) (Automated edit: Adding CZ:Workgroups to Category:Bot-created Related Articles subpages)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Discussion
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Placebo effect.
See also changes related to Placebo effect, or pages that link to Placebo effect or to this page or whose text contains "Placebo effect".

Parent topics

Subtopics

Other related topics

Bot-suggested topics

Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/Placebo effect. Needs checking by a human.

  • Adam Smith [r]: Scottish moral philosopher and political economist (1723-1790), a major contributor to the modern perception of free market economics; author of Wealth of Nations (1776). [e]
  • Critical views of chiropractic [r]: An indepth discussion of the aspects of chiropractic that define its position in the modern healthcare arena with special emphasis on those related to its role in alternative medicine. [e]
  • Homeopathy [r]: System of alternative medicine involving administration of highly diluted substances with the intention to stimulate the body's natural healing processes, not considered proven by mainstream science. [e]
  • Placebo [r]: A treatment or drug, administered by, or at the orders of, a health professional, that the professional knows will have no physiologic effect [e]
  • Psychoneuroimmunology [r]: Study of the interactions between behavior, the brain, and the immune system. [e]
  • Randomized controlled trial [r]: Method used to ensure objectivity when testing medical treatments. [e]
  • Sham treatment [r]: Use of some parts of a treatment that do have physical effects on a subject, which are intended to act as placebo where it is impossible to have a completely neutral equivalent to the treatment. While a pill with no active ingredients can be a placebo, for surgery, sham surgery would require at least anesthesia and an incision. [e]