Difference between revisions of "Blank verse"

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'''Blank verse''' is the English term for unrhymed verse, usually applied to the [[iambic pentameter]].  Some of the greatest works of English poetry have been written in this medium: ''[[Paradise Lost]]'', ''[[The Prelude]]'', and ''[[The Ring and the Book]]''.
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'''Blank verse''' is the English term for unrhymed verse, usually applied to the [[iambic pentameter]].  Probably first used by the Tudor poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547), in a translation of the second book of Virgil's Aeneid.
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Some of the greatest works of English poetry have been written in this medium: ''[[Paradise Lost]]'', ''[[The Prelude]]'', and ''[[The Ring and the Book]]''.  It has also been much used in [[drama]].

Latest revision as of 21:14, 8 September 2020

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Blank verse is the English term for unrhymed verse, usually applied to the iambic pentameter. Probably first used by the Tudor poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547), in a translation of the second book of Virgil's Aeneid.

Some of the greatest works of English poetry have been written in this medium: Paradise Lost, The Prelude, and The Ring and the Book. It has also been much used in drama.